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Thread: Should I be taking steps to prepare for Bibleworks ultimately not working?

  1. #1
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    Default Should I be taking steps to prepare for Bibleworks ultimately not working?

    I love Bibleworks, and have years of saved notes on Bible passages and biblical topics. So I'm wondering how long I will have access to those, and if I should be taking steps now to save those for future use if and when Bibleworks stops working.

    Or maybe I am over-reacting.

    Any suggestions? Thank you so much.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SDF View Post
    I love Bibleworks, and have years of saved notes on Bible passages and biblical topics. So I'm wondering how long I will have access to those, and if I should be taking steps now to save those for future use if and when Bibleworks stops working.

    Or maybe I am over-reacting.

    Any suggestions? Thank you so much.
    As long as MSWord, Google docs, and other office programs exist you have mostly no problem. BW notes are basically rich text format which all office editors handle. Open any one of them. Browse to your BW notes folder and open any note. You can compare it with the same note opened in the BW editor. The rich text formatting in BW has some added features like links to verses that will not work because there is no Bible text in those editors to refer to. Usually a reference will be seen but formatted strangely. Try a note that has such a link in it and you will see.

    If there is a problem, the note extension could be changed from .bww to .rtf. Then double clicking the file should open it as long as a default is set for rtf. You could try that as well to see how it works.

    If BW no longer runs, and things work then as they do now, open file explorer to a BW note. Right click on the note, select Open with > Choose another app and then choose WordPad or any other rich text format capable editor such as MS Word. Click the box to always use that program. I just did it and it works. To set it back to BW, repeat but choose BW. I just did and that reset the default to BW.

    But I do not expect BW to stop working for me. I have an old laptop with Windows 7. I never connect it to the internet since there are no regular security updates but BW runs on it. I think there are computers that run XP and BW. For now compatability updates for Windows 10 have been made available.

    I value the functionality of BW so much that when BW closed I bought an inexpensive but adequate laptop just to run BW. It is worth the money for me. I do not connect it to the internet for Windows updates. It runs Windows 10 and BW and should until the laptop dies. As I don't use it much I expect to depart this life before that laptop does.

    I just checked Ebay and there were almost 300 used, working laptops for between $75 and $150. There were laptops that would run BW acceptably like the one I bought for less than $300 at Best Buy.
    Last edited by now john; 11-10-2019 at 09:13 AM.

  3. #3
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    Default Bibleworks in the future

    Quote Originally Posted by now john View Post
    As long as MSWord, Google docs, and other office programs exist you have mostly no problem. BW notes are basically rich text format which all office editors handle. Open any one of them. Browse to your BW notes folder and open any note. You can compare it with the same note opened in the BW editor. The rich text formatting in BW has some added features like links to verses that will not work because there is no Bible text in those editors to refer to. Usually a reference will be seen but formatted strangely. Try a note that has such a link in it and you will see.

    If there is a problem, the note extension could be changed from .bww to .rtf. Then double clicking the file should open it as long as a default is set for rtf. You could try that as well to see how it works.

    If BW no longer runs, and things work then as they do now, open file explorer to a BW note. Right click on the note, select Open with > Choose another app and then choose WordPad or any other rich text format capable editor such as MS Word. Click the box to always use that program. I just did it and it works. To set it back to BW, repeat but choose BW. I just did and that reset the default to BW.

    But I do not expect BW to stop working for me. I have an old laptop with Windows 7. I never connect it to the internet since there are no regular security updates but BW runs on it. I think there are computers that run XP and BW. For now compatability updates for Windows 10 have been made available.

    I value the functionality of BW so much that when BW closed I bought an inexpensive but adequate laptop just to run BW. It is worth the money for me. I do not connect it to the internet for Windows updates. It runs Windows 10 and BW and should until the laptop dies. As I don't use it much I expect to depart this life before that laptop does.

    I just checked Ebay and there were almost 300 used, working laptops for between $75 and $150. There were laptops that would run BW acceptably like the one I bought for less than $300 at Best Buy.
    My opinion is that as long as there is a Windows OS you will be able to run BibleWorks 10. If something happens to break BW10 it, I will fix it unless it requires a complete rewrite. Even if Microsoft eventually drops 32 bit programs, we are already distributing a 64 bit windows version that has been tested. You can run it now, though believe it or not it actually runs a little slower than the 32 bit version. But I don't anticipate any of that happening. Windows has too many business users that would be outraged. Older versions of BW are likely to continue working indefinitely as well. So, really, don't worry about something you cannot control.

    I hate to be an alarmist, but the greater danger long term is a culture that becomes so antagonistic to Christianity that it bans all software like BibleWorks. This is one reason we deliberately avoided close dependencies on the Internet. If that happens, you will have much bigger things to be concerned about. Now John's solution is the only thing that could be done in that case. Buy print books and memorize Scripture.

    Mike

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    Mike, you're the best. Thank you for all you have done and continue to do.
    καὶ ὑπὲρ πάντων ἀπέθανεν ἵνα οἱ ζῶντες μηκέτι ἑαυτοῖς ζῶσιν, ἀλλὰ τῷ ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν ἀποθανόντι καὶ ἐγερθέντι.

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    Thank you Mike!

  6. #6
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    Why not the same commitment to your Mac customers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MBushell View Post
    I hate to be an alarmist, but the greater danger long term is a culture that becomes so antagonistic to Christianity that it bans all software like BibleWorks. This is one reason we deliberately avoided close dependencies on the Internet. If that happens, you will have much bigger things to be concerned about. Now John's solution is the only thing that could be done in that case. Buy print books and memorize Scripture.

    Mike
    Mike, I sincerely honor, appreciate, and thank God for all that you have done for students, scholars and lovers of the Bible. But just on this point, I'd have to respectfully chime in with a different viewpoint. The fact that Christianity no longer dominates Western culture does not mean that Western culture is about to persecute us and stamp us out. The loss of social and cultural power and respect that churches have experienced in the last hundred years or so, which has certainly accelerated in the last quarter-century or so, is painful and even humiliating, and certainly frustrating. But not running the show is not the same thing as being dragged off the stage. Muttering into our coffee about how persecuted we are and imagining how much worse it could get, in my view, only wastes energy and debilitates the soul. Greeting my Jewish and Muslim and atheist neighbors with "Happy Holidays" is not going to put an end to Christmas. Christians are going to have to get used to being treated as just one other group or component within society, and make our witness from outside the places of power.

    I apologize if the above seems disrespectful. Please know that I am undyingly grateful for all you have done, Mike, even if we may have different theological perspectives. I am not naturally a particularly optimistic person. But the idea that Bible software will be banned seems like an unfortunate thing to spend one's mental (let alone spiritual) energy on.
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR View Post
    Mike, I sincerely honor, appreciate, and thank God for all that you have done for students, scholars and lovers of the Bible. But just on this point, I'd have to respectfully chime in with a different viewpoint. The fact that Christianity no longer dominates Western culture does not mean that Western culture is about to persecute us and stamp us out. The loss of social and cultural power and respect that churches have experienced in the last hundred years or so, which has certainly accelerated in the last quarter-century or so, is painful and even humiliating, and certainly frustrating. But not running the show is not the same thing as being dragged off the stage. Muttering into our coffee about how persecuted we are and imagining how much worse it could get, in my view, only wastes energy and debilitates the soul. Greeting my Jewish and Muslim and atheist neighbors with "Happy Holidays" is not going to put an end to Christmas. Christians are going to have to get used to being treated as just one other group or component within society, and make our witness from outside the places of power.

    I apologize if the above seems disrespectful. Please know that I am undyingly grateful for all you have done, Mike, even if we may have different theological perspectives. I am not naturally a particularly optimistic person. But the idea that Bible software will be banned seems like an unfortunate thing to spend one's mental (let alone spiritual) energy on.
    I should probably let Mike speak for himself, but I assume he is alluding more to recent restrictions in free speech (and possible further restrictions) than to changes in conventional greetings or to the "changing of the guard," so to speak.
    Last edited by Lee; 11-15-2019 at 12:54 AM.
    καὶ ὑπὲρ πάντων ἀπέθανεν ἵνα οἱ ζῶντες μηκέτι ἑαυτοῖς ζῶσιν, ἀλλὰ τῷ ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν ἀποθανόντι καὶ ἐγερθέντι.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    I should probably let Mike speak for himself, but I assume he is alluding more to recent restrictions in free speech (and possible further restrictions) than to changes in conventional greetings or to the "changing of the guard," so to speak.
    Lee, I'm so tempted to explore this further, but I will not. It would only have us lobbing URLs at each other, I suspect, and I don't want to get into that here among fellow believers.

    I would like to say this, wildly off topic though it is: In the current media and cultural environment in the U.S., every media outlet--NPR, CNN, Fox, bloggers, podcasters, all of them--knows and follows the dictum that fear and anger rivet the attention; it's a natural human response. Faces in front of screens ratchets up what they can charge sponsors, and they will put in the foreground whatever will agitate, distress, and concern their audiences the most, so that that churning emotion will keep us glued to our screens. And so we all get wound up about pseudo-stuff that is intended to wind us up and keep us watching. Unwind! Unplug! End of sermon.
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR View Post
    Lee, I'm so tempted to explore this further, but I will not. It would only have us lobbing URLs at each other, I suspect, and I don't want to get into that here among fellow believers.

    I would like to say this, wildly off topic though it is: In the current media and cultural environment in the U.S., every media outlet--NPR, CNN, Fox, bloggers, podcasters, all of them--knows and follows the dictum that fear and anger rivet the attention; it's a natural human response. Faces in front of screens ratchets up what they can charge sponsors, and they will put in the foreground whatever will agitate, distress, and concern their audiences the most, so that that churning emotion will keep us glued to our screens. And so we all get wound up about pseudo-stuff that is intended to wind us up and keep us watching. Unwind! Unplug! End of sermon.
    I had no intention of citing media outlets. That professing Christians have seen their First Amendment rights of speech and religion erode in recent years is a fact so obvious it requires no documentation. I don't necessarily foresee it degenerating to the extreme Mike mentions in his post any time soon; but I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand, either.
    καὶ ὑπὲρ πάντων ἀπέθανεν ἵνα οἱ ζῶντες μηκέτι ἑαυτοῖς ζῶσιν, ἀλλὰ τῷ ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν ἀποθανόντι καὶ ἐγερθέντι.

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