Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: The end is near... What modules should I buy?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    1

    Default The end is near... What modules should I buy?

    I love BibleWorks and I don't mind dropping some hard-earned bucks to ugrade it into top-form. before the plug is pulled on the store. I am a recent seminary grad, doing pastoral ministry. Which modules do you think are most worthwhile? Which are redundant? Right now, I just have Bibleworks 10 and no modules. Thanks in advance for any tips!

  2. #2

    Default

    At the very least I'd get these...

    -- A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, Second Edition, by Bruce M. Metzger (might already be in BW 10, I can't remember)
    -- Combination Offer: BDAG and HALOT Modules (BDAG/HALOT)
    -- Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament (3 vols.), Horst Balz and Gerhard Schneider,
    -- Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (Abridged) (TDNT)
    -- Biblical Greek by Maximilian Zerwick. (ZERW) (good supplement to the included Greek grammars)


    Dave
    David Spear
    Calvary Chapel of Manassas
    Manassas, Va. 20110
    http://www.calvarychapelmanassas.org/
    KJV Romans 3:28 Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without (apart from) the deeds of the law.

  3. #3

    Default

    • Depending how deep you go into the original languages, the Stuttgart modules are great.
    • IMO, the Crossway ESV Bible Atlas is the best study atlas available.
    • Depending on your interests, some of the WORDsearch modules are good.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Glatfelter Professor of Biblical Studies
    United Lutheran Seminary at Gettysburg & Philadelphia
    uls.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by calvary View Post
    At the very least I'd get these...
    -- A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, Second Edition, by Bruce M. Metzger (might already be in BW 10, I can't remember)
    -- Combination Offer: BDAG and HALOT Modules (BDAG/HALOT)
    -- Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament (3 vols.), Horst Balz and Gerhard Schneider,
    -- Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (Abridged) (TDNT)
    -- Biblical Greek by Maximilian Zerwick. (ZERW) (good supplement to the included Greek grammars)

    Dave
    These are great suggestions, also looked at SOLM that MGVH suggested. I could perhaps justify around $200 so I can't get all these suggested ones so I was wondering:

    1. In SOLM I noticed that you get the UBS4 text and the Stuttgartensia Biblica Hebraica which are the texts I used in Seminary. However, in working with BW for the last 5 years I haven't noticed huge differences in the texts that are already included in BW10. What am I missing out on? (I recognize that they include the apparatus too, but I have been content with the NT apparatus included in BW10)

    2. I have the paper copy of BAG before it was BDAG, but have never seen Halot. Would this set be the best use of my $200? Admittedly, I'm not the best linguist no one will be asking me to teach Greek or Hebrew soon, but I do use my Greek and Hebrew every week in preparations of sermons and Bible Studies, and I have found the current BW10 dictionaries to be a real blessing. Will I be adding a lot by getting the BDAG and HALOT combo?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    771

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevedaley View Post
    2. I have the paper copy of BAG before it was BDAG, but have never seen Halot. Would this set be the best use of my $200? Admittedly, I'm not the best linguist no one will be asking me to teach Greek or Hebrew soon, but I do use my Greek and Hebrew every week in preparations of sermons and Bible Studies, and I have found the current BW10 dictionaries to be a real blessing. Will I be adding a lot by getting the BDAG and HALOT combo?
    You'd be getting a significant update in scholarship in going from BAG to BDAG, since the later is based on a revised German original as well as incorporating more recent linguistic and textual research. And of course the convenience in digital over paper is significant. E.g., studying Hebrews 4:1 in BW 10, I want to look up κατάπαυσις (rest). Hovering the mouse over it brings it up in BDAG, where the discussion lists a dozen or so biblical verses (LXX and NT). Then I just hover over them to bring them up in a popup. Doing all that with paper books just doesn't compare for efficiency; and of course I can easily copy the texts to build up my sermon notes.

    As for HALOT, if you're only going to buy a couple of modules, I would go with lexicons. If you're using BDB, HALOT is incomparably better if only because it is more recent (Hebrew lexicography advanced by leaps and bounds in the 20th century). If you're using Holladay, HALOT gives so much more detail. To me--just my opinion--getting at the nuances of word meanings with high-end lexicons lays a foundation on which you can build as you study those words in their contexts.
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevedaley View Post
    These are great suggestions, also looked at SOLM that MGVH suggested. I could perhaps justify around $200 so I can't get all these suggested ones so I was wondering:

    1. In SOLM I noticed that you get the UBS4 text and the Stuttgartensia Biblica Hebraica which are the texts I used in Seminary. However, in working with BW for the last 5 years I haven't noticed huge differences in the texts that are already included in BW10. What am I missing out on? (I recognize that they include the apparatus too, but I have been content with the NT apparatus included in BW10)
    SOLM includes the footnotes for BHS. The actual text is almost identical to WTT. If you never look at the footnotes, you don't need SOLM... Unless you also use the LXX. In that case the LEH OT Greek lexicon is included in SOLM (but I see that you can still purchase that separately). For Greek SOLM also includes the footnotes to Rahlf's LXX. But, if you simply read the texts, you don't absolutely need these footnotes. We did without them in BW for years.
    Mark Eddy
    Last edited by Mark Eddy; 06-15-2018 at 04:37 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    I made a decision and bought the combo BDAG and HALOT. After a peek at those this afternoon, I think I made the right decision. Having a deeper depth Greek and Hebrew lexicon with instant access is worth more to my work than additional Greek and Hebrew texts. All of the modules are wonderful, but I'm happy with my decision. Now on to use BW10 until I can't install it anymore on a desktop computer.

  8. #8

    Thumbs up

    Good choice!
    David Spear
    Calvary Chapel of Manassas
    Manassas, Va. 20110
    http://www.calvarychapelmanassas.org/
    KJV Romans 3:28 Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without (apart from) the deeds of the law.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •