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Thread: The Best and Most Widely Used Greek Text of the Septuagint and the Eng. Translation

  1. #1

    Default The Best and Most Widely Used Greek Text of the Septuagint and the Eng. Translation

    The version which has the abbreviations BGT and BGM in BibleWorks 10 apparently uses Alfred Rahlfs’ edition of the Greek Septuagint. I am writing some material on the usage of certain words in the Greek Septuagint and need to find out what version of the Septuagint is the best and what corresponding English translation is the most accurate.

    NETS (A New English Translation of the Septuagint) is based on Alfred Rahlfs’ text and is included in BibleWorks 10.

    I want to find out the following:

    Is Rahlfs’ text the best version of the Septuagint?

    Does BGT in BibleWorks 10 contain the same edition of the Septuagint as LXXRH (which is also included in the software)? Or is LXXRH a later, updated edition of Rahlfs’ text of the Septuagint?

    Does NETS adhere to Rahlfs' text completely, and can it be used as an exact translation of Rahlfs’ text? Or is there a better English translation of the Septuagint?
    Last edited by Vlad Kotenko; 02-22-2017 at 03:32 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vlad Kotenko View Post
    The version which has the abbreviations BGT and BGM in BibleWorks 10 apparently uses Alfred Rahlfs’ edition of the Greek Septuagint. I am writing some material on the usage of certain words in the Greek Septuagint and need to find out what version of the Septuagint is the best and what corresponding English translation is the most accurate.

    NETS (A New English Translation of the Septuagint) is based on Alfred Rahlfs’ text and is included in BibleWorks 10.

    I want to find out the following:

    Is Rahlfs’ text the best version of the Septuagint?

    Does BGT in BibleWorks 10 contain the same edition of the Septuagint as LXXRH (which is also included in the software)? Or is LXXRH a later, updated edition of Rahlfs’ text of the Septuagint?

    Does NETS adhere to Rahlfs' text completely, and can it be used as an exact translation of Rahlfs’ text? Or is there a better English translation of the Septuagint?
    Hello Vlad,

    This may not answer all your questions, but it can hopefully help out a bit. The BGT and the LXXRH have the same text. The LXXRH, though, is an add-on, which is sold with the critical apparatus. It also contains punctuation (commas, etc.), which the BGT does not. These features are important if you are planning to do academic work on the LXX, or searches in the Greek text that take punctuation into account.

    I'd say that that Rahlfs edition is probably the still best one-volume edition you can find. You can also get the Göttingen edition of the LXX, with a very extensive critical apparatus. Its text is usually – though not always – identical to the Rahlfs edition. This is a multi-volume work and represents a major investment money-wise. BibleWorks does not carry it, but you can find it in a couple other Bible Software programs that won't be mentioned here.

    You can also get Swete's version of the LXX as a user-created document by Pasquale Amicarelli. Here's some information on it:

    https://www.bibleworks.com/forums/sh...ighlight=Swete

    This is a public domain text, based on the text of Vaticanus (I believe). It also comes with a critical apparatus, that more extensive than the Rahlf-Hanhart edition, but also more dated. You can find it in other Bible software programs, but you'll have to pay separately for it there.

    As to the NETS, as a translation it has the same qualities and defects as any translation. I.e., by definition, it sometimes paraphrases the text in ways that could be debated, and sometimes gives translations that could be improved on or even corrected. No translation replaces the original text. That being said, it is, generally speaking, a very good translation, and aims at being as close to the Greek text as possible. The Benton text, which also comes in BibleWorks, is an older translation, but generally close to the Greek text also. It is highly spoken of by some of the contributors to the NETS translation. The two can be used as points of comparison to the Greek text of the LXX.

    I hope this gives you a little better idea of what you're looking for! Someone else may chime in and give you some supplementary information.

    Best regards,

    Donald Cobb
    Aix-en-Provence, France

  3. #3

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    Thank you for the information on Rahlfs’ text and NETS. I will use LXXHR, NETS, and LXA in BibleWorks 10. Rahlfs’ text has evidently been used for a long time as a modern edition of the Septuagint.

    The LXXRH, though, is an add-on, which is sold with the critical apparatus.
    Can you explain how to access the critical apparatus for LXXHR or other versions in BibleWorks?

    You can also get Swete's version of the LXX as a user-created document by Pasquale Amicarelli. Here's some information on it:

    https://www.bibleworks.com/forums/sh...ighlight=Swete
    Do you know where it is possible to download BibleWorks 10 add-on module containing Swete’s version of the Septuagint along with the critical apparatus mentioned in the above link?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vlad Kotenko View Post
    Does NETS adhere to Rahlfs' text completely, and can it be used as an exact translation of Rahlfs’ text? Or is there a better English translation of the Septuagint?
    My understanding is that the Göttingen edition is not yet complete.
    NETS uses Göttingen where it is available, Rhalfs for the rest.
    On the main BW10 menu bar Resources/miscellaneous/New English Translation of the Septuagint brings up the very extensive NETS introductory material. The introduction to each book tells which edition of the greek text was used for that book.
    Does BGT in BibleWorks 10 contain the same edition of the Septuagint as LXXRH (which is also included in the software)? Or is LXXRH a later, updated edition of Rahlfs’ text of the Septuagint?
    No. BGT has the older LXT.

    BW10 ships with the following:
    • LXT - LXX Septuaginta (Old Greek Jewish Scriptures) edited by Alfred Rahlfs.
      Copyright © 1935 by the Württembergische Bibelanstalt / Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft (German Bible Society), Stuttgart.
    • BLM - BibleWorks LXX/OG Morphology and Lemma Database, 1999-2001 Edition.
      BLM is the morphological database for LXT
    • BGT - This database is a combination of the BNT and LXT databases. This allows people who want to work with both versions at once to easily do combined searches.
    • BGM - combined BNM and BLM databases

    The extra-cost module Stuttgart Original Languages Module (Old Testament) (SOLO)
    contains the following:
    • LXXRH - Septuaginta, Alfred Rahlfs, Robert Hanhart (Editors)
      Copyright (c) Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft (2007)
      The apparatus for LXXRH can be found in the Analysis Window Tabs under VS1 or VS2.
    • LXXRH-M The morphology database for LXXRH
      Copyright (c) 2014 BibleWorks, LLC
    • GLT - This is combined version of the NA28 Greek New Testament and the Rahlfs-Hanhart edition of the LXX.
    • GLM - morphology database for GLT
      Copyright (c) 2015 BibleWorks, LLC

    The above descriptions were extracted from the BW descriptions. You can display the full descriptions in the Analysis Window Tabs under Analysis, by moving your cursor over the version name in the Browse Window.

    --Jim

  5. #5

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    Hmm.... I can't find the link to Pasquale's download anymore either, but I had it once upon a time because I have LXX-SW in my collection along with the text critical notes that appear in Vs1.
    The three volumes of Swete are on archive.org 1Here 2Here 3Here

    Do also note:
    • Brooke and McLean edition of Vaticanus with many textual notes. Start HERE for Genesis on archive.org
    • Ottley's tex of Isaiah from Alexandrinus HERE
    • Field's work on Origen's Hexapla is also rather necessary vol1 vol2
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Glatfelter Professor of Biblical Studies
    United Lutheran Seminary at Gettysburg & Philadelphia
    uls.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  6. #6

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    Thank you for the information about various editoins of the Greek Septuagint. Some of the best texts are apparently Göttingen Septuagint and the earlier edition of Rahlfs.

  7. #7

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    NETS in BibleWorks 10 does not display verses 5-11 in Job 26:

    Name:  Job 26.PNG
Views: 3975
Size:  42.9 KB

    The printed edition of NETS contains verses 5-11. Does anyone know why not all verses are displayed in the program?
    Last edited by Vlad Kotenko; 02-24-2017 at 01:05 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Lines added by Origen from Theodotion

    Quote Originally Posted by Vlad Kotenko View Post
    NETS in BibleWorks 10 does not display verses 5-11 in Job 26:
    The printed edition of NETS contains verses 5-11. Does anyone know why not all verses are displayed in the program?
    The BW version NETS contains only the OG (Old Greek) parts of Job.
    The BW version NETSX contains the "complete" Job, including both the OG and the "asterisked" stuff added by Origen from Theodotion. In this version each added line begins with a †, and each added section ends with a ‡.
    See the NETS introduction to Iob that I mentioned in my previous note for more information.

    --Jim

  9. #9

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    BibleWorks displays TH (Theodotion’s text) below LXXRH:

    Name:  LXXRH, TH.PNG
Views: 3878
Size:  40.6 KB

    Since TH is given as an accompanying version (the text of which is not exactly the same as in LXXRH), do you know whether the Old Greek text of the book of Daniel is used in LXXRH?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vlad Kotenko View Post
    BibleWorks displays TH (Theodotion’s text) below LXXRH:

    Name:  LXXRH, TH.PNG
Views: 3878
Size:  40.6 KB

    Since TH is given as an accompanying version (the text of which is not exactly the same as in LXXRH), do you know whether the Old Greek text of the book of Daniel is used in LXXRH?
    Hello Vlad,

    The Old Greek (LXX) text of Daniel was not as widely used as Theodotion's in Antiquity. In the Ralf's print edition, the two versions are given together, the LXX on the top part of the page, TH on the bottom part. In LXXRH and LXT you have both of them, as is the case in the print edition.

    Don Cobb

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