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Thread: Searching for specific cases of prepositions

  1. #1
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    Default Searching for specific cases of prepositions

    Hi,
    How do I perform a search giving me, let's say, the places, where para takes an accusative object?
    Since the object can be lots of things, I was unable to produce a meaningful 'pros *@[*]-string.
    But I sense it is possible to do such a search with a string, is it not? Or is the GSE needed?
    Thanks,
    Morten

  2. #2
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    Search in a morphology version, E.g. BGM. On the command line type:
    .para@pa
    This will find all instances in which the Greek preposition para governs an accusative. The object might be a noun, pronoun, participle, even an infinitive. This will highlight only the preposition, not its object. But you should be able to find the object closely following the proposition.
    I hope this helps.
    Mark Eddy
    Last edited by Mark Eddy; 11-25-2015 at 10:38 PM. Reason: corrected typo on morphology version

  3. #3
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    Thanks Mark!

    So the "tricky" thing here is that unlike regular @-searches, the @-qualification does not concern the preceding word (ie. the prep.) but the following.
    Makes sense though different than the usual.

    Morten

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Eddy View Post
    Search in a morphology version, E.g. BGT. On the command line type:
    .para@pa
    This will find all instances in which the Greek preposition para governs an accusative. The object might be a noun, pronoun, participle, even an infinitive. This will highlight only the preposition, not its object. But you should be able to find the object closely following the proposition.
    I hope this helps.
    Mark Eddy
    Mark is correct when he says to search in a morphology version, but he means BGM (not BGT)
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Glatfelter Professor of Biblical Studies
    United Lutheran Seminary at Gettysburg & Philadelphia
    uls.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MortenJensen View Post
    So the "tricky" thing here is that unlike regular @-searches, the @-qualification does not concern the preceding word (ie. the prep.) but the following.
    Makes sense though different than the usual.
    Actually this is not that different from usual. Prepositions can be followed by either accusative, dative, and/or genitive cases. What the creators of the morphology versions did was check the context to find which of these cases the preposition actually is governing in each specific instance, then they tell you that case as it identifies the preposition, without your having to look at the following words to see what case is actually there. So @pa or @pd or @pg do refer to the preposition itself, not absolutely but in context. This feature helps show how much work went into making these morphology versions.
    Mark Eddy

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Eddy View Post
    Actually this is not that different from usual. Prepositions can be followed by either accusative, dative, and/or genitive cases. What the creators of the morphology versions did was check the context to find which of these cases the preposition actually is governing in each specific instance, then they tell you that case as it identifies the preposition, without your having to look at the following words to see what case is actually there. So @pa or @pd or @pg do refer to the preposition itself, not absolutely but in context. This feature helps show how much work went into making these morphology versions.
    Mark Eddy
    Thank you Mark for pointing that out. This is a very nice feature, one that I totally ignored until your post yesterday. I had done similar searches in the past, but specifying the case of the words that follow the preposition, i.e., 'παρα *2 *@[nvad]a* (I was actually going to suggest this to Morten, but you responded more quickly). Your solution gives slightly better results, too.

    Yes, this gives a good idea of the work put into the morphology versions. Kudos to all involved!

    Donald Cobb
    Aix-en-Provence, France

  7. #7
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    Thanks again for the clarification. So there is a deeper level of tagging than meets the eye . Wonderful!
    Morten

  8. #8
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    Applause from me also, to the morphology version creators for including this in their arduous task (and I can easily imagine places that required careful decisions), and to Mark for pointing it out. I too was quite ignorant of this marvelous possibility.

    So, for instance, it is possible to investigate Paul's use of κατὰ + genitive in Gal 5:23 (κατὰ τῶν τοιούτων οὐκ ἔστιν νόμος), usually translated "against such things" but, it has always seemed to me, surely to be rendered "concerning such things," and see if there are any parallels in his other letters. And very quickly, voilą, I find 1 Cor 15:15, ἐμαρτυρήσαμεν κατὰ τοῦ θεοῦ ὅτι ἤγειρεν τὸν Χριστόν; and perhaps 1 Cor 11:4, κατὰ κεφαλῆς ἔχων, and more remotely 2 Cor 8:2, ἡ κατὰ βάθους πτωχεία αὐτῶν. Another excellent tool!
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

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