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Thread: Search of the Imperative, "hear."

  1. #1
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    Default Search of the Imperative, "hear."

    I am hoping that this is an easy question, I feel like I should know how to do this search but for some reason I don't. I am trying to run a search of the word, "שׁמע" I would like all the occurrences of this word in the imperative. I would then like to be able to look at all those cases in the KWIC to see the phrases that typically follow after the word.

    Thank You in advance.
    Chris Sansom
    M. Div. Concordia Seminary
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  2. #2

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    .vm[@v?v*

    vm[ is the root, but I'm not on my Pc and don't have the font installed.

    Then you just open up the KWIC, IIRC.

    Edit: actually, type that in to the KWIC, don't input it from the command line.
    Last edited by Ben Spackman; 11-12-2009 at 12:04 PM.
    Ben

  3. #3
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    Thank you very much, that worked for me and gave me the information in which I was looking for.
    Chris Sansom
    M. Div. Concordia Seminary
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Spackman View Post
    .vm[@v?v*

    vm[ is the root, but I'm not on my Pc and don't have the font installed.

    Then you just open up the KWIC, IIRC.

    Edit: actually, type that in to the KWIC, don't input it from the command line.
    How do you type that into the command line? Whenever I am in WTM and try and do something like this, the @v?v* comes out in Hebrew characters.

    Although, interestingly, when I copied and pasted it from your example above, it was fine (except I had to reverse the root letters).

  5. #5

    Default Hebrew characters in command line

    Are you sure you are searching on WTM - and not WTT. If you search on WTT you are not able to do the "@v*" type searches since WTT has no morphological tags. To do those, you must set your search version to WTM - not WTT. Hope that helps.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by brethicks View Post
    Are you sure you are searching on WTM - and not WTT. If you search on WTT you are not able to do the "@v*" type searches since WTT has no morphological tags. To do those, you must set your search version to WTM - not WTT. Hope that helps.
    I double checked, and, yes, I was searching on WTM. I still can't type directly this particular code without it coming out in Hebrew.

    I find I usually just use the Morphology Assistant when I use a Hebrew search such as this.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimofbentley View Post
    I double checked, and, yes, I was searching on WTM. I still can't type directly this particular code without it coming out in Hebrew.

    I find I usually just use the Morphology Assistant when I use a Hebrew search such as this.
    Hey Jim, good that you're searching on WTM. But one other thing you might want to check. After typing the lemma of the word you're attempting to search, are you moving the cursor to the right of the Hebrew before typing in the @ sign?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISalzman View Post
    Hey Jim, good that you're searching on WTM. But one other thing you might want to check. After typing the lemma of the word you're attempting to search, are you moving the cursor to the right of the Hebrew before typing in the @ sign?
    Yes I was, but in trying all sorts of things I figured out what I was doing wrong.

    I was putting a "space" between the end of the word (well, the beginning really - as Hebrew starts at the right) and the @. If you put in a space, it continues in Hebrew characters (final form of Peh for the @), if you don't put in a space, you get the @ and can continue with the search.

    This, of course, makes sense from a programming point of view because you would never have a final form of the letter at the beginning of the word - so it is a good marker.

    Thanks guys for prodding me on to look at it.
    Last edited by jimofbentley; 11-14-2009 at 05:59 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimofbentley View Post
    Yes I was, but in trying all sorts of things I figured out what I was doing wrong.

    I was putting a "space" between the end of the word (well, the beginning really - as Hebrew starts at the right) and the @. If you put in a space, it continues in Hebrew characters (final form of Peh for the @), if you don't put in a space, you get the @ and can continue with the search.

    This, of course, makes sense from a programming point of view because you would never have a final form of the letter at the beginning of the word - so it is a good marker.

    Thanks guys for prodding me on to look at it.
    Glad you got it worked out, Jim. Now maybe you can tell us a little bit about the bush kangaroos of the Australian Outback. When I was a kid, there was a TV show called "Skippy, the bush kangaroo." I've not forgotten it apparently.

  10. #10
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    I am glad that other people had issues with that as well. I originally tried to do the search with WTT and couldn't figure it out, I looked it up in the help files and was able to correct myself but it is also good to know not to add spaces, something I never would have thought of, but probably would have done at some point.
    Chris Sansom
    M. Div. Concordia Seminary
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