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Thread: English translation of the Vugate ?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Default English translation of the Vugate ?

    Dear friends,

    teaching Latin, I want to use more beneficial texts than Ovid (and the old mythological texts) and so forth, that's why I wanted to use the Latin Vulgate for exercises. My thanks goes to BibleWorks for the VULM Version of the Vulgate with the great morphological and lexical Infos (not always correct - but not many Errors). A great help indeed ! Now I'd be interested in an English Translation of the Vulgate - just to control my own Translation. There is something in the Internet: www.vulgate.org - but I haven't checked the qualtity. Is there a modul for Bibleworks of an English Vulgate Translation (maybe the one mentioned above)?
    If not please let me know as well !
    Yours
    Peter, Germany

  2. #2
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter View Post
    Dear friends,

    teaching Latin, I want to use more beneficial texts than Ovid (and the old mythological texts) and so forth, that's why I wanted to use the Latin Vulgate for exercises. My thanks goes to BibleWorks for the VULM Version of the Vulgate with the great morphological and lexical Infos (not always correct - but not many Errors). A great help indeed ! Now I'd be interested in an English Translation of the Vulgate - just to control my own Translation. There is something in the Internet: www.vulgate.org - but I haven't checked the qualtity. Is there a modul for Bibleworks of an English Vulgate Translation (maybe the one mentioned above)?
    If not please let me know as well !
    Yours
    Peter, Germany
    Peter, I may be wrong on this one, but I'm pretty sure the Douay-Reims version is based on the Vulgate.

    Best wishes during this Easter season
    χριστὸς ἀνέστη έκ νεκρῶν

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Cobb View Post
    Peter, I may be wrong on this one, but I'm pretty sure the Douay-Reims version is based on the Vulgate.

    Best wishes during this Easter season
    χριστὸς ἀνέστη έκ νεκρῶν
    Thanks, Donald ! I think that is what I need - there is no German Vulgate Translation available (but planned), so the DR is the best for me currently. Not very modern, but it serves my needs.

    Iesus mortuus est et resurrexit - veni cito Domine !

    Yours
    Peter, Germany

  4. #4
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    Apr 2004
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    Yes, DRA was translated from the Vulgate.
    Concerning German translations of the Vulgate: parts of the Apocrypha in Luther's German Bible were translated from the Vulgate, since there was no Greek text available at the time. I would have to look into it more to find out which parts (if not all) those were, and if LUT in BibleWorks actually retains Luther's translation in the Apocrypha, or whether it has been updated too.
    Mark Eddy
    Last edited by Mark Eddy; 04-20-2014 at 11:38 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Eddy View Post
    Yes, DRA was translated from the Vulgate.
    Concerning German translations of the Vulgate: parts of the Apocrypha in Luther's German Bible were translated from the Vulgate, since there was no Greek text available at the time. I would have to look into it more to find out which parts (if not all) those were, and if LUT in BibleWorks actually retains Luther's translation in the Apocrypha, or whether it has been updated too.
    Mark Eddy
    Dear Mark,
    a good hint ! Thank you - I can check this out. One question: do today's English speaking People understand the DRA easily? For me there are some uncommon words contained and I doubt that they are used today. Well, some years old. I think I'll get the German Vulgate Translation when finished, but by now I check my Translations by the DRA and the VULM info, which are very beneficial (thanks again, BibleWorks for including this valuable module - I like it and only some few remarks are disputable).

    The DRA is sometimes old fashioned - at least in my Impression as a foreign Reader.

    Yours
    Peter, Germany

  6. #6
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    Mar 2009
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    An interesting project, Peter! The Douay-Rheims is well known for using terminology that was archaic, obscure, or overly Latinate even for English speakers of its own day (for instance, "predestinated" in Rom 1:4). Modern-day English readers would find many of these terms quite unfamiliar.

    I see, by the way, that even Vulgate.org includes the D-R as its English version. Contemporary Catholic versions, of course, are based directly on the Hebrew and Greek, so that there is not much call for a translation of the Vulgate. It's possible that there is a more modern English translation of the Vulgate in existence, whether authorized by the Catholic Church for common use or a more academic/scholarly version; but it might take some research to find this out.
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

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