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Thread: How to view the NA28 Greek apparatus to determine textual variance for a text?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Exclamation How to view the NA28 Greek apparatus to determine textual variance for a text?

    Hi,

    I just bought BW9 and I feel rather lost. How do I view the NA28 Greek apparatus to determine textual variance for a text, e.g. 1 Cor 11:17-34?

    I'm aware that BW has its own Greek apparatus.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by swooshiex View Post
    Hi,

    I just bought BW9 and I feel rather lost. How do I view the NA28 Greek apparatus to determine textual variance for a text, e.g. 1 Cor 11:17-34?

    I'm aware that BW has its own Greek apparatus.

    Thank you!
    BibleWorks currently has the NA28 text, but not the apparatus. They have signed a contract to add the apparatus at some point in the future, but it has to be properly coded for use in BibleWorks.
    Michael Hanel
    PhD candidate Classics Univ. of Cincinnati
    MDiv Concordia Seminary
    MA Classics Washington University
    Unofficial BibleWorks Blog
    LibraryThing!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by swooshiex View Post
    Hi,

    I just bought BW9 and I feel rather lost. How do I view the NA28 Greek apparatus to determine textual variance for a text, e.g. 1 Cor 11:17-34?

    I'm aware that BW has its own Greek apparatus.

    Thank you!
    As Michael said, BW9 does not have the NA28 critical apparatus. One thing you can do, however (and it's actually more comprehensive than NA) is go to "tools" => "viewing the text" => "text comparison settings." Then in "versions to compare" put (for example) BGT BYZ, i.e., the NA text and the Majority text. Click on "enable."

    You can then open a parallel window, including these two texts:

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    (BTW, I've also put in the parallel texts in French; but you can add whatever ones you want, including other Greek texts.)

    That will give you a basic idea of some of the major differences between these two texts.

    You can then go to the "verse" pane and look at the different textual witnesses for more information on specific variants:

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    You can also do the same for the various manuscripts that come with BibleWorks9 (i.e., Sinaiticus, Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, etc.). By clicking on the "manuscripts" tab, you can automatically see the differences between them.

    All this gives you some very useful tools that, in some ways, actually go beyond the NA28 apparatus, even if they don't quite replace it!

    Be sure to look at the user videos, which are extremely helpful for unlocking BW9's capacities.

    Regards,

    Don Cobb
    Aix-en-Provence, France

  4. #4
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    Oct 2013
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    thank you both for the fast replies!

    I just remembered that got this reply from customer support previously:

    BibleWorks 9 comes with the Center for New Testament Textual Studies' New Testament Critical Apparatus. This extensive database is an ongoing project devoted to recording and distributing a full critical apparatus built from thousands of manuscripts. The BibleWorks edition of the CNTTS NT Critical Apparatus strives to make it simple to access and to search the apparatus data. The BibleWorks edition has enhanced the database by adding a manuscript date and Aland category matrix for each variant reading. As you browse the text of the Bible, the CNTTS database tracks and displays in the BibleWorks main window, in the Verse Tab. If you want to do a series of detailed searches, BibleWorks includes a search window for the apparatus. The significant, insignificant, and singular readings are summarized at the beginning of each verse's entry, and each variant is presented with the full text of the verse, highlighting the variant text.

    I haven't figured out how to access and use this apparatus though.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Cobb View Post

    (BTW, I've also put in the parallel texts in French; but you can add whatever ones you want, including other Greek texts.)
    Hi Don, I notice you've got the same French version (LSG) open twice. I assume that is Louis Segond? Of course, you are free to have whichever versions for comparison that you so choose. But I'm just curious to understand why you would have two windows (or panes, actually) showing the same version. La curiosite a tue le chat, alors!

    Que le seigneur te benisse!

    Irving

  6. #6
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISalzman View Post
    Hi Don, I notice you've got the same French version (LSG) open twice. I assume that is Louis Segond? Of course, you are free to have whichever versions for comparison that you so choose. But I'm just curious to understand why you would have two windows (or panes, actually) showing the same version. La curiosite a tue le chat, alors!

    Que le seigneur te benisse!

    Irving
    Hello Irving,

    Logical question--and I want to answer before the cat dies! (my deepest apologies for all those who didn't get that!). I actually have a number of pre-set parallel windows setups. I usually use that specific one for putting two different passages in parallel (e.g., 1 Co 15.22ff, SEG and BGT, PLUS Ps 110.1ff, SEG and BGT). I was just too lazy to do a custom setup.

    I find that option of setting up favorites for parallel windows very helpful, and use it all the time. In particular for the OT it's especially useful (i.e., SEG WTT BGT LXE).

    Blessings,

    Don

  7. #7
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    Sep 2007
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    Logical answer, Don. Thanks.

    Irving

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