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Thread: Word Processors for Hebrew Language

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    17

    Question Word Processors for Hebrew Language

    I was wondering what electronic tools BW users employ when they have to include Hebrew and English words in a document, e.g. when writing notes, tests or exams for students learning Hebrew.

    Using Word, I have been labouriously typing Hebrew terms in reverse order (left to right), then changing to the bwhebb.ttf font, but I'm sure there's got to be a better solution.

    I have seen the Unitype Global Writer word processor advertised, and wonder if anyone has tried it?

    Any comments, help, suggestions, advice will be gratefully received. Thank you.

  2. #2

    Default Hebrew in BW or use Unicode

    It would certainly seem easier to type in Hebrew in the Editor window in BW and then copy and paste into your word processor.
    If you are using WinXP, however, a better solution might be simply to use Unicode in MSWord. (You really need WinXP to do this without frustration.) You would need to get a suitable font (the free SBL Hebrew font would be great) and then install Tavultesoft's free keyboard utility. You get automatic right-to-left support, and it also works great for Greek.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  3. #3

    Default RE: Word Processsors for Hebrew

    Greetings,

    You may want to look at DavkaWriter or Dagesh Pro. Both can be purchased on the Internet. I prefer DavkaWriter, which is currently at "Platinum" version 5.

    While I'm on the subject....
    Soap Box Mode On.

    BibleWorks would do well to have a look at DavkaWriter's keyboard layout and interface capabilities. Language input is an afterthought in BibleWorks, that I have hoped, over the last several versions, would be corrected. It has not. The simplest non-English language input in the Command Line box, is unnecessarily difficult and clumsy. BibleWorks needs to supply a means for providing user-selectable non-English keyboard layouts to which the user is accustomed, rather than forcing them to adopt yet-again, another arcane keyboard interface.

    BibleWorks seriously needs a genuine quality word processor, and/or the ability to seamlessly integrate with a word processor of the user's choice, using any font set and keyboard layout.

    Soap Box Mode Off.



  4. #4

    Default There is hope.

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Henley

    Soap Box Mode On.

    BibleWorks would do well to have a look at DavkaWriter's keyboard layout and interface capabilities. Language input is an afterthought in BibleWorks, that I have hoped, over the last several versions, would be corrected. It has not. The simplest non-English language input in the Command Line box, is unnecessarily difficult and clumsy. BibleWorks needs to supply a means for providing user-selectable non-English keyboard layouts to which the user is accustomed, rather than forcing them to adopt yet-again, another arcane keyboard interface.

    BibleWorks seriously needs a genuine quality word processor, and/or the ability to seamlessly integrate with a word processor of the user's choice, using any font set and keyboard layout.

    Soap Box Mode Off.
    There is hope for the future of the editor. See the following tread:

    http://www.bibleworks.com/forums/sho...97&postcount=1

    As always feel free to send your ideas to ideas@bibleworks.com. Since they are already working on the editor this would be a good time to send such ideas.
    Joe Fleener

    jfleener@digitalexegesis.com
    Home Page: www.digitalexegesis.com
    Blog: http://emethaletheia.blogspot.com/

    Annotated Bibliography of Online Research Tools: www.digitalexegesis.com/bibliography

    User Created BibleWorks Modules: www.digitalexegesis.com/bibleworks



    Psalm 46:11
    `#r<a'(B' ~Wra' ~yIAGB; ~Wra' ~yhi_l{a/ ykinOa'-yKi W[d>W WPr>h;

  5. #5

    Default Davka Writer or Dagesh Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Henley
    Greetings,

    You may want to look at DavkaWriter or Dagesh Pro. Both can be purchased on the Internet. I prefer DavkaWriter, which is currently at "Platinum" version 5.

    Hi, Richard. I have looked at several websites since reading your post. Are there reasons other than price that you prefer DavkaWriter to Dagesh Pro? I would like to know.

    Thank you.

    Scott L. Adams

  6. #6

    Default Word Processors for Hebrew Language

    Scott,

    In response to your question, there are several reasons why I prefer DavkaWriter both subjective and objective.

    Although I started out with DavkaWriter, I also have Dagesh Pro. Being used to a products characteristics, certainly makes a difference in ones perspective. On the other hand, I find DavkaWriter offers more of the kinds of tools that I typically need. Thats one of the reasons I keep gravitating back to it. In my opinion, DavkaWriter generally provides a better and more accessible set of resources for text input, formatting, and printing. This hasnt always been the case, which is why I originally purchased Dagesh Pro, but the latest version of DavkaWriter is more refined and polished than earlier versions. I am now normally able to get my work accomplished in a relatively straightforward manner with DavkaWriter.

    You will probably have to try each program for yourself. You may use a Hebrew word processor in different ways than I use it, and have different expectations, which may bring you to an entirely different conclusion.

    Hope this helps.

    Richard.

  7. #7

    Default Another option: NotaBene

    Another option for entering Hebrew (and any other language really) that uses Unicode is Nota Bene. You would need the Lingua Workstation.
    It is pricey, but it does everything. Many dissertations including mine have been written using Nota Bene.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  8. #8

    Default

    Hi Mark,

    Thanks for bringing Nota Bene into the discussion.

    Years ago a friend used a DOS version of Nota Bene, and my impression of the program was positive, but it was a unique environment unto itself, as was virtually every program of that era. At that time, programs such as DOS WordStar were the dominant word processors in the PC world. I occasionally wondered what happened to Nota Bene, thinking it followed WordStar into obscurity as the PC world transitioned to a Windows environment.

    Im happy to see Nota Bene made the transition. As a result of your message, I went to the Nota Bene website. You are correct, it is expensive, both as an initial purchase and for upgrades, but if I remember correctly, that has always been the case. On the other hand, if Nota Bene provides a superior set of tools, it may be worth the cost to someone who engages in serious writing. Ill have a closer look at it myself. Their pricing though, will be a significant hurdle to overcome.

    Richard Henley



  9. #9

    Default It is worth it...

    Hi Richard,

    I believe you will find Nota Bene worth every penny (and I agree it takes plenty of pennies!).

    If you give them a call they will send you a demo version which would allow you to test most of the functions and features. It is amazing. If you go with Nota Bene, I highly recommend BookWhere as well for all you bibliographic needs. I have not typed a footnote or bibliography from scratch in two years!
    Joe Fleener

    jfleener@digitalexegesis.com
    Home Page: www.digitalexegesis.com
    Blog: http://emethaletheia.blogspot.com/

    Annotated Bibliography of Online Research Tools: www.digitalexegesis.com/bibliography

    User Created BibleWorks Modules: www.digitalexegesis.com/bibleworks



    Psalm 46:11
    `#r<a'(B' ~Wra' ~yIAGB; ~Wra' ~yhi_l{a/ ykinOa'-yKi W[d>W WPr>h;

  10. #10

    Default

    [QUOTE=ptd99uk]I was wondering what electronic tools BW users employ when they have to include Hebrew and English words in a document,....I have been labouriously typing Hebrew terms in reverse order (left to right), then changing to the bwhebb.ttf font, but I'm sure there's got to be a better solution.

    Suggestion 1: Cut and paste examples from BibleWorks rather than typing.

    Suggestion 2: Use NotaBene www.notabene.com, which provides powerful academic word processing, including not only Greek and Hebrew but even correct word wrap in Hebrew. The downside: It's not a very elegant program and has a steep learning curve. Nonetheless, I've moved to it and and glad I did.

    Suggestion 3: Hang on using suggestion one until full Unicode comes to Windows and MSWord. Windows XP is Unicode compatible, though with some remaining problems I hear; and perhaps the next version of Word will be fully Unicode compatible.
    Last edited by Dale A. Brueggemann; 12-15-2004 at 05:11 AM.

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