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Thread: NA28 ante portas!

  1. #1
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    Default NA28 ante portas!

    I found the news today browsing through autumn publishing catalogues. Should be published in September 2012.

    Should we look for it in BW10?

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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by berniebond View Post
    Should we look for it in BW10?
    Or sooner?
    καὶ ὑπὲρ πάντων ἀπέθανεν ἵνα οἱ ζῶντες μηκέτι ἑαυτοῖς ζῶσιν, ἀλλὰ τῷ ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν ἀποθανόντι καὶ ἐγερθέντι.

  3. #3
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    My real question is how will it be different than NA27. I guess only time will tell.

    BTW - who is saying Sept? CBD is listing it as Christmas. In any event, it is quite common for these types of dates to be up in the air.
    Last edited by Michael Hanel; 06-02-2012 at 03:00 PM.
    Michael Hanel
    PhD candidate Classics Univ. of Cincinnati
    MDiv Concordia Seminary
    MA Classics Washington University
    Unofficial BibleWorks Blog
    LibraryThing!

  4. #4
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    Via amazon germany you can already pre-order your NA28th. The release date is set for 31th Oct 2012.
    There´s also a brief description in german about some changes.
    http://www.amazon.de/Nestle-Aland-No...sr=1-2-catcorr

    Blessings,
    Steffen

  5. #5
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    Default How good is your German? :-)

    Maybe the English edition is coming out later. I will check at work on Monday. Here is the main page from the catalogue:

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  6. #6
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    So far it sounds to me like the biggest changes are in the textual apparatus not the text itself. At least, what they make to be a big deal is the "30 changes in the Catholic epistles" due to work on the Editio Critica Maior. If that's it for textual changes, one can easily export BNT and make those changes now and call it NA28 (Wieland has a list of them here). Anyway, if that's the main difference between NA27 and NA28, I'm not sure what that would mean for BW getting it. The ongoing problem has been that the GBS and BibleWorks have not been able to agree upon a license for the critical apparatus. Based on deals GBS has made with the other software companies around, it would seem that one large hang-up is cost. BibleWorks tries to include all standard translations/editions in the main program, but the costs associated with the GBS texts is such that BW couldn't do that without dramatically increasing the cost of the base package. Speculation aside, the critical apparatus in NA28 will remain a different means of understanding the text. I wouldn't say it's better than the CNTTS apparatus that we have in BW9 because it is not exhaustive, but it does contain some information that CNTTS does not yet have, like witnesses in translations and citations in the Church Fathers (even though those are somewhat problematic).
    Michael Hanel
    PhD candidate Classics Univ. of Cincinnati
    MDiv Concordia Seminary
    MA Classics Washington University
    Unofficial BibleWorks Blog
    LibraryThing!

  7. #7
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    Looks like you can pre-order on Amazon USA.

    Here's the description there:
    This is the twenty-eighth edition of the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece (NA28). NA28 is the standard scholarly edition of the Greek New Testament used by scholars, Bible translators, professors, students, and pastors worldwide. Now NA28 has been revised and improved: . Critical apparatus revised and easier to use . Papyrii 117-127 included for the first time . In-depth revision of the Catholic Epistles, with more than 30 changes to the upper text . Scripture references systematically reviewed for accuracy . The NA28 with Dictionary includes the Greek-English Dictionary of the New Testament prepared by Barclay M. Newman.

    Let's just hope "hardcover" means actual hardcover. Looks like there are both options for "imitation leather" and "hardcover" on CBD.

  8. #8
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    Cool NA28 vs. NA27 and Byz

    NA28 has been available in Europe for a month or so, but so far it hasn't been available yet in the USA. Fortunately the web is working faster than the printing presses. There are a few useful sites to learn about the NA28. First and foremost, is Wieland Willker's website which includes a list of differences between NA27 and the Editio Critica Maior (ECM) of the Catholic Epistles. For a long time this was the best source of information about NA28, but it is not the same thing as the NA28 text. The NA28 text is supposed to be the same as the second edition of the ECM, which will be published after the NA28 is out. In other words, sometimes in the first edition of the ECM a reading that the editors preferred was rejected in the end for the NA28, or one that was not chosen in the ECM first edition did make the cut to the NA28. Thanks to Wieland for collating this information.

    So far then, the only way to learn what the NA28 text was to a) wait for it to arrive in America or b) compare Wieland's website with abbreviated list of verses changed on the official Nestle-Aland website. Fortunately a better solution has arrived in the form of a) Larry Hurtado's brief preview of the NA28 in which he lists all the verses that are different in the NA28 and b) the official online version of the NA28 text.

    Putting the two of those together, I took Larry Hurtado's list of differences and compared the online version of NA28 with the NA27 and BYZ texts in a Word doc so that people would have not merely the list of verses changed, but the actual content of those verses. Obviously what will really interest people is the reason decisions were made, including the list of manuscripts in support of each reading. I have not provided that kind of information here. But I think what you will have should give you a good idea of what's happened in the text of the NA28.

    Remember, the only textual differences between the NA27 and NA28 occur in the Catholic Epistles. In all other places the text is the same. Obviously there are other changes in the NA28 that may make it worth owning, but now you know the differences in the base text between the two versions.

    DOWNLOAD - NA28 vs. NA27 (and BYZ) text comparison.

    If you find that I have missed any of the textual changes (or copied them incorrectly), please let me know and I will update the comparison.
    Michael Hanel
    PhD candidate Classics Univ. of Cincinnati
    MDiv Concordia Seminary
    MA Classics Washington University
    Unofficial BibleWorks Blog
    LibraryThing!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Hanel View Post
    NA28 has been available in Europe for a month or so, but so far it hasn't been available yet in the USA. Fortunately the web is working faster than the printing presses. There are a few useful sites to learn about the NA28. First and foremost, is Wieland Willker's website which includes a list of differences between NA27 and the Editio Critica Maior (ECM) of the Catholic Epistles. For a long time this was the best source of information about NA28, but it is not the same thing as the NA28 text. The NA28 text is supposed to be the same as the second edition of the ECM, which will be published after the NA28 is out. In other words, sometimes in the first edition of the ECM a reading that the editors preferred was rejected in the end for the NA28, or one that was not chosen in the ECM first edition did make the cut to the NA28. Thanks to Wieland for collating this information.

    So far then, the only way to learn what the NA28 text was to a) wait for it to arrive in America or b) compare Wieland's website with abbreviated list of verses changed on the official Nestle-Aland website. Fortunately a better solution has arrived in the form of a) Larry Hurtado's brief preview of the NA28 in which he lists all the verses that are different in the NA28 and b) the official online version of the NA28 text.

    Putting the two of those together, I took Larry Hurtado's list of differences and compared the online version of NA28 with the NA27 and BYZ texts in a Word doc so that people would have not merely the list of verses changed, but the actual content of those verses. Obviously what will really interest people is the reason decisions were made, including the list of manuscripts in support of each reading. I have not provided that kind of information here. But I think what you will have should give you a good idea of what's happened in the text of the NA28.

    Remember, the only textual differences between the NA27 and NA28 occur in the Catholic Epistles. In all other places the text is the same. Obviously there are other changes in the NA28 that may make it worth owning, but now you know the differences in the base text between the two versions.

    DOWNLOAD - NA28 vs. NA27 (and BYZ) text comparison.

    If you find that I have missed any of the textual changes (or copied them incorrectly), please let me know and I will update the comparison.
    Thanks for doing that, Michael. What Greek font did you use? For some reason, several of the characters (anything with an accent, breathing mark, or final form sigma) came through as gobbledygook when I downloaded it.

    It's interesting to note that, based on your comments at the end of each passage, NA28 seems overall to be moving closer to the Byzantine/Majority Text tradition.
    καὶ ὑπὲρ πάντων ἀπέθανεν ἵνα οἱ ζῶντες μηκέτι ἑαυτοῖς ζῶσιν, ἀλλὰ τῷ ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν ἀποθανόντι καὶ ἐγερθέντι.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Thanks for doing that, Michael. What Greek font did you use? For some reason, several of the characters (anything with an accent, breathing mark, or final form sigma) came through as gobbledygook when I downloaded it.

    It's interesting to note that, based on your comments at the end of each passage, NA28 seems overall to be moving closer to the Byzantine/Majority Text tradition.
    Oh, it's the Word 2010 default font: Calibri. Just select all (control-a) and change the font to something better. I'll fix the font in the document too. I'm just so lazy I never remember to do that even though I don't really like Calibri.
    Michael Hanel
    PhD candidate Classics Univ. of Cincinnati
    MDiv Concordia Seminary
    MA Classics Washington University
    Unofficial BibleWorks Blog
    LibraryThing!

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