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Thread: Apnt = pes?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default Apnt = pes?

    This is probably a really dumb question, but I just installed BW9 and I'm having a hard time remembering where to find the APNT Peshitta. Is it what is showing up in the "Hebrew" texts list as PES? Or is that something different? I don't see APNT as such listed anywhere. Thanks.
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    471

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR View Post
    This is probably a really dumb question, but I just installed BW9 and I'm having a hard time remembering where to find the APNT Peshitta. Is it what is showing up in the "Hebrew" texts list as PES? Or is that something different? I don't see APNT as such listed anywhere. Thanks.
    PES comes with BibleWorks and will correspond with Magiera's Peshitta Morphology but it is not the APNT.

    The APNT is listed as PEM
    PEM= Magiera Peshitta Morphology
    PMH= Magiera Peshitta Hebrew ( Transliterated into the standard Ashuri Alphabet or Square Script)
    PMA= 1905 British and Foreign Bible Societies Peshitto

    Although, the above texts are Aramaic (or rather Syriac) they will all be found under the heading Hebrew in BibleWorks.
    Brian K. Mitchell
    חפשו בתורה היטב ואל תסתמכו על דברי
    http://www.adfontes.mitchellbk.com/


  3. #3
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    Mar 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bkMitchell View Post
    PES comes with BibleWorks and will correspond with Magiera's Peshitta Morphology but it is not the APNT.

    The APNT is listed as PEM
    PEM= Magiera Peshitta Morphology
    PMH= Magiera Peshitta Hebrew ( Transliterated into the standard Ashuri Alphabet or Square Script)
    PMA= 1905 British and Foreign Bible Societies Peshitto

    Although, the above texts are Aramaic (or rather Syriac) they will all be found under the heading Hebrew in BibleWorks.
    Thanks, Brian. PEM was going to be my other choice for the identity of APNT. It's a little confusing; I was thrown off by the copyright date for APNT being 2005, whereas in the list of "Hebrew" texts PEM is shown as 2006.

    I see that PEM/APNT includes not only morphological analysis but some brief lexical information as well. Looks like a good tool. Now if we could just have a more readable Syriac font....

    Merry Christmas to you and to all!
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

  4. #4

    Default Check this list

    I have posted a complete listing of BW9 texts with abbreviations and categorized in a variety of ways in spreadsheet format.
    Read about it HERE.
    (A direct link to the online Google Docs version is here.)
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MGVH View Post
    I have posted a complete listing of BW9 texts with abbreviations and categorized in a variety of ways in spreadsheet format.
    Read about it HERE.
    (A direct link to the online Google Docs version is here.)
    Thanks, Mark. Very impressive!
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

  6. #6

    Default Glad to help...

    ... since I think I'm just repaying some help you provided to me way back in the day!
    If I recall correctly, we were both using NotaBene, and you had developed a 9-pin printer font or something like that for Greek. I was working on a font for Syriac for an Epson 9-pin printer. That was a long time ago!
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  7. #7
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    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGVH View Post
    ... since I think I'm just repaying some help you provided to me way back in the day!
    If I recall correctly, we were both using NotaBene, and you had developed a 9-pin printer font or something like that for Greek. I was working on a font for Syriac for an Epson 9-pin printer. That was a long time ago!
    Wow. That would have been a long time ago. I do remember fooling around with fonts, but more likely you're thinking of my little program that converted CCAT biblical files into Nota Bene format. I have to say, I'm glad that BibleWorks has blown that completely away!
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

  8. #8

    Default Yes

    that was it! I remember needing those CCAT files when I working on my dissertation and was using NotaBene for DOS. Must have been around 1984 or so.
    And yes, I'm glad I'm using BibleWorks now too!
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Let me just add, for the benefit of others who may see this, that what BW has blown away was the need for auxiliary programs to convert encoded Greek and Hebrew texts into Nota Bene format. NB itself continues on, and works very well in combination with BW. They're in the beta stage of NB v. 10, which will have a number of interface and functionality enhancements, including working natively under 64-bit operating systems.
    David Rensberger
    Atlanta, Georgia

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