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Thread: LXX symbol in bwgrkl

  1. #1
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    Default LXX symbol in bwgrkl

    In his book on the text of the Old Testament, Ernst Würthwein marks the Septuagint with a special symbol, other than LXX (cf. The Text of the Old Testament (Eerdmans Publishing 1995), p. 50). It looks like a S, but it also seems somewhat like a G. I haven't got a clue what character it is and I don't see something like it in the Bibleworks font bwgrkl (where I do recognize symbols of the Codex Sinaiticus (aleph), the Majority Text (M), papyrus (P) etc. Does anyone know where to find that LXX-symbol of Würthwein?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aries View Post
    In his book on the text of the Old Testament, Ernst Würthwein marks the Septuagint with a special symbol, other than LXX (cf. The Text of the Old Testament (Eerdmans Publishing 1995), p. 50).
    I believe that is a Gothic or Blackletter font for 'G' you should try looking at the Textualis typeface it may look fairly simular.

    You can find it included in SIL Apparatus fonts.(link)
    "The SIL Apparatus Fonts were designed to provide most of the symbols needed to reproduce the textual apparatus found in major editions of Greek & Hebrew biblical texts."



    Also, a letter like it is encoded in Unicode see below:
    20178𝕲1D572MATHEMATICAL BOLD FRAKTUR CAPITAL G
    Brian K. Mitchell
    חפשו בתורה היטב ואל תסתמכו על דברי
    http://www.adfontes.mitchellbk.com/


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aries View Post
    In his book on the text of the Old Testament, Ernst Würthwein marks the Septuagint with a special symbol, other than LXX (cf. The Text of the Old Testament (Eerdmans Publishing 1995), p. 50). It looks like a S, but it also seems somewhat like a G. I haven't got a clue what character it is and I don't see something like it in the Bibleworks font bwgrkl (where I do recognize symbols of the Codex Sinaiticus (aleph), the Majority Text (M), papyrus (P) etc. Does anyone know where to find that LXX-symbol of Würthwein?
    It's actually a Gothic 'G' for Greek. It is the typical LXX symbol in the apparatus of the Hebrew Old Testament. If you have a copy of BHS (Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia), in the prolegomena, they explain/decipher all the symbols. The Gothic 'G' stands for the Septuagint or LXX. Würthwein's is a great book, isn't it?

  4. #4

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    You can enter the LXX symbol in Word using Unicode. Type 1D516 and then hit ALT-X.
    For more info, see THIS POST and follow the links.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGVH View Post
    You can enter the LXX symbol in Word using Unicode. Type 1D516 and then hit ALT-X.
    For more info, see THIS POST and follow the links.
    Hey Mark, would that trick work in Word 2003 (in Windows XP)? Thanks.

  6. #6

    Default LXX is a Gothic S

    Actually, it is not the Gothic G but a Gothic S (for Septuagint).
    It has it owns specified coding in the Unicode consortium (see this PDF) as:
    "1D516 MATHEMATICAL FRAKTUR CAPITAL S = Septuagint, Greek Old Testament"

    So use 1D516
    (and not 1D50A = fraktur capital G or 1D572 which is a bold fraktur capital G)
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  7. #7

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    I'm unable to check that anymore... but I'm pretty sure that it does.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  8. #8
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    Thanks Mark.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGVH View Post
    Actually, it is not the Gothic G but a Gothic S (for Septuagint).
    Thanks for the correction and info.

    Quick Question though: what do you think of the SIL(summer institute of Lingustistic)'s SIL apparatus fonts in Unicode?(link)
    Brian K. Mitchell
    חפשו בתורה היטב ואל תסתמכו על דברי
    http://www.adfontes.mitchellbk.com/


  10. #10

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    It is an attractive font, somewhat heavy in weight, but clear. The frakturs are simplified. (So that S really looks more like a S and is not confused with G.) It is also nice to have a Unicode font that includes all the apparatus characters.
    Still, I tend to use Cardo because it includes all the apparatus characters and all the Greek and Hebrew. It's just easier to have one Unicode font to handle all that stuff.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

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