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Thread: Are any Jewish commentators (Rashi, Ibn Ezra) available?

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  1. #1
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    Default Are any Jewish commentators (Rashi, Ibn Ezra) available?

    Are any of the Jewish commentaries available on line?
    Michael

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    Quote Originally Posted by MBD View Post
    Are any of the Jewish commentaries available on line?
    You can try this for starters --

    http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/...aimonides.html

    And Davka, though it costs, has an array of stuff. For example, I have Rashi, as well as others, from Davka --

    http://www.davka.com/cgi-bin/index.cgi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adelphos View Post
    .... And Davka, though it costs, has an array of stuff. For example, I have Rashi, as well as others, from Davka --

    http://www.davka.com/cgi-bin/index.cgi
    This has some cool stuff. I remember when you posted this a while back. It seems like their inventory has grown, possibly. Mostly, I looked at the Hebrew word processor last time, which might be why I don't remember these other offerings.


    Wouldn't mind my daughters saturating themselves in this game.

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    I keep reading all these posts about people having problems with Hebrew and MS Word and I just say, too bad, it's your own fault, because I have mentioned many times how utterly effortless it is to type Hebrew, Hebrew/English, English/Hebrew, import Hebrew, et cetera, et cetera into Davka Writer.

    Yes, Davka has proprietary fonts, but they also have good unicode support, so you have to make changes very rarely.

    If people are determined to suffer with MS Word and Hebrew, so be it, but I can do in seconds in Davka what it somtimes takes fifteen minutes or a half hour to do in MS Word.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adelphos View Post
    I keep reading all these posts about people having problems with Hebrew and MS Word and I just say, too bad, it's your own fault, because I have mentioned many times how utterly effortless it is to type Hebrew, Hebrew/English, English/Hebrew, import Hebrew, et cetera, et cetera into Davka Writer. ....
    I can only speak for myself. On the one hand, you've sold me. On the other hand, I can't at this time afford Davka. As usual, it comes down to the "bottom line." $$$$$$$

    I looked at this word processor when you mentioned in the past, because I wanted to practice writing in Hebrew. My Greek professor @ DTS mentioned one time, that a great way to learn the Koine Greek is to start writing it in.

    This seems logical. I would practice my Biblical Hebrew in the same way, by writing letters or notes or whattheheckever, referencing the library of grammars and lexicons in BW. I tried this in MS Word. I tried this in the BW Editor. I lost my sanctification every single time. Thank God for 1 John 1:9.

    But, in viewing Davka right after you mentioned it in the past, it seemed the far and away better choice. The far and away better choice, but for the "bottom line." $$$$$$$$$$

    I'd still like to practice my Hebrew this way. I'd like to practice it using Davka. I just can't see, at this point, forking the funds over. That's all.

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    Well, yes, it does cost money, but it's really pretty cheap, and once you get used to simply hitting alt+/ to type Hebrew smack in the middle of an English sentence, and have everything line up perfectly and automatically, and then hit alt+/ again to switch back to English, and then again to Hebrew, plus so many other features, it sure beats dorking around with MS Word in trying to get just one sentence right, which you can hardly ever do anyway.

  7. #7

    Default Online Rashi

    The great Rashi's commentary on the Torah (5 books), who often notes other classic commentary, can be found here and here.

    Also, there are a few Rabbinic works in Google books.
    a;koue( VIsrah,l( ku,rioj o` qeo.j h`mw/n ku,rioj ei-j evstin( kai. avgaph,seij ku,rion to.n qeo,n sou evx o[lhj th/j kardi,aj sou kai. evx o[lhj th/j yuch/j sou kai. evx o[lhj th/j dianoi,aj sou kai. evx o[lhj th/j ivscu,oj sou

    עשׁה שׁלום במרומיו הוא יעשׂה שׁלום עלינו ועל כל ישׂראל ואמרו אמן׃

    "Will you rise like a lion in the morning sun or will you just lay there bleeding? When the time has come, return to the Kingdom, close my eyes and be screaming freedom!" - Matisyahu

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    Default Jewish Commentaries available

    Quote Originally Posted by MBD View Post
    Are any of the Jewish commentaries available on line?
    Michael
    Yes! Here are a few sites of interest:
    (1)http://he.wikisource.org/wiki/
    (2)http://www.hebrewbooks.org/
    (3)http://www.seforimonline.org/
    (4)http://www.karaim.net/

    If, you want to save time searching for good texts it might be better to spend a little money on a digital library.

    (1)Judaic Bookshelf - Master Library
    Powerful Digital Research and Study Resource
    ISBN: 1-931711-53-4

    (2)Bar Ilan Classic Library
    ISBN: 1-931711-27-5 (expensive but very good)


    (3)Tanach Plus (this is by far the cheapest of the three and it has the Rishonim(Rashi, Ibn Ezra, the Rambam, and the other Torah giants)

    Powerful Digital Research and Study ResourceSummary of Texts Included:
    Bible & 24 traditional Commentaries
    ראשונים, Mishna & Commentary, 613 Mitzvah Database + links to actual Bible source for the Mitzvah, Talmud & Commentary, Midrash Aggada, Midrash Halacha, Kaballa, Halacha, Daily Prayer, Sabbath Prayer, Holiday Prayer...
    ISBN: 1-931711-66-6

    Grace and Peace,
    bkMitchell














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    bkMitchell,

    I notice that one of your links is to a Karaite site. The Karaites at one time believed that the points are original/contemporary with either Moses or Ezra. Do they still believe this? It seems from reading Wikipedia and other sites that they still do. I'm just curious, if you happen to know.
    Last edited by Adelphos; 09-05-2009 at 09:47 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adelphos View Post
    bkMitchell,

    I notice that one of your links is to a Karaite site. The Karaites at one time believed that the points are original/contemporary with either Moses or Ezra. Do they still believe this? It seems from reading Wikipedia and other sites that they still do. I'm just curious, if you happen to know.
    Adelphos,

    the simple answer is yes. The Karaites still believe the Torah as well as all the rest of the Hebrew Bible including it's correct pronunciation was revealed, and is inspired and prefect. Some take it so seriously that they pronounce YHVH as it is written in the massoretic texts.

    You will notice that when the ultra-orthodox attack the reform Judaism they sometimes claim the Karaites have more in common with orthodoxy than the reform. The reason for this Karaites believe Torah was given at Sinai while some reforms and conservative Jews accept the documentary theory.

    The longer answer is:
    It does appear that traditionally the Karaites ,like everyone else, believed that the vowel points (Nikkudot) and their accents(Te'amim) Or at least their exact phonetic values were dictated to Moses from heaven( it is probably the later that most accept today).

    The former point of view is illustrated here by a:
    12th century Byzantine Karaite Jehuda Haddassi, actually included the knowledge of Hebrew grammar and its specific categories among his ten principles of faith: '[One must Know] the nature of its [the Bible] language, its conjugations, explanation, path, reading, pronunciation, intonation, vowels, vocalization of the past and the future, masdar, infinitive, imperative, simple, and derived stem, intransitive verbs, absolute and construct state, passive participle, Muf'al and Nif'al, and so one.' (Hebrew study from Ezra to Ben-Yehuda page 165; the Knowledge of Hebrew among early Karaites, and it's use in Karaite legal contracts Judith Olszoy-Schlanger).

    However, the later point of view might be imagined that the modern Karaite would still have to account for the various non-tiberian systems. M.H. Goshen-Gottstein concluded the Palestinian pointing is basically similar to the ancestor of the Ben-Asher and Ben-Naphtali traditions, even though it uses a different graphic system.(the history of the Hebrew Language Angel Saenz-Badillos page 93)
    In other words despite the various ancient vowel notation systems that have come to our attention all seem to indicate one common pronunciation or at least similar pronunciations. Therefore, the various pointing traditions rarely bother the Karaites because they of the common belief that all represent they same thing.

    Obviously the Tiberian Massoretic tradition and one close to that of the so called second rabbinic Bible(not the commentaries of course) is the one in which many Karaites a lined themselves with. An example of this union can be pointed out by the fact that Karaites rarely dealt with matters of the correct pointing, as they believed the Massoretic treaties were the court of jury on such matters. Here is one example of that:
    The Diqduq(grammar) of Ibn Nuh is closely allied in many ways to the work of the Masoretes and some of the Hebrew terms of the Diqduq can be found also in the Hebrew work of the massoretic literature dating from the before the tenth century. The fact that there is very little treatment of pronunciation in the Diqduq is likely to reflect the intention of Ibn Nuh that his work would complement Masoretic treatises on the reading tradition. (Hebrew Scholarship and the Medieval World edited by Nicholas de Lange Early eastern traditions of Hebrew grammar Page 83)

    If Ben Asher and Ben Naphtali were Karaites this would account for their cantankerous debates on those vowel points despite that fact that their systems were very, very, close. After all Naphtali's teacher was probably Asher father or grandfather!

    Each believed he was passing on the revealed massorah from Sinai and that the other must be mistaken. It is highly, doubtful that either believed he was creating or introducing something new. If that had been the case the other surely would have pointed it out for attack.

    Grace and Peace,
    bk.Mitchell





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