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Thread: No Brenton LXX in Greek?

  1. #1
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    Default No Brenton LXX in Greek?

    Just opened BW8 for the first time. It looks like Brenton's LXX is only available in English, not Greek? I wonder why BW would provide one language, but not the other.

  2. #2
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    Apr 2004
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    181

    Default From BW help

    From BW Help file, chapter 61

    LXA - The Seputagint with Apocrypha, by Sir Lancelot C.L. Brenton, Samuel Bagster & Sons, London, 1851. Electronic text provided by The Common Man's Prospective, Copyright © 1999-2008 Ernest C. Marsh, http://www.ecmarsh.com/lxx. Used by permission.

    Is that what you're looking for?

  3. #3
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    Default LXA is English, as is LXE

    LXA is English as is LXE. Doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

    Version Statistics:
    Version ID: LXA
    Description: Brenton LXX with Apocrypha
    Language: English

  4. #4
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    Default Disappointed

    Looks like it is missing, along with the 2005 version of Robinson-Pierpont. I will submit a request to have them added.

  5. #5
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    Default 2005 Robinson is there

    The 2005 Robinson-Pierpont is part of BW8. BW8 incorrectly calls in the older, 1995 version in several places, but it definitely is the 2005 version.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SiegfriedX View Post
    LXA is English as is LXE. Doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

    Version Statistics:
    Version ID: LXA
    Description: Brenton LXX with Apocrypha
    Language: English
    Unless I'm mistaken Brenton refers to the English translation, not the Greek text of the Septuagint.
    Michael Hanel
    PhD candidate Classics Univ. of Cincinnati
    MDiv Concordia Seminary
    MA Classics Washington University
    Unofficial BibleWorks Blog
    LibraryThing!

  7. #7
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    Default

    The only edition of the LXX in BibleWorks is the Rahlfs edition (without footnotes). You find it in LXT and BGT. I don't own the printed Brenton's LXX, so I do not know how different the Greek text is from Rahlfs. From the comparisons which I have made between Brenton's English and Rahlfs LXX, they seem to be based on basically the same Greek text. What do you see as an advantage to having Brenton's Greek LXX?
    Mark Eddy

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Eddy View Post
    What do you see as an advantage to having Brenton's Greek LXX?
    Mark Eddy
    Brenton's is more of a "pure play", using Codex Vaticanus wherever possible, while Ralf's is a critical text is which he picked from a bunch of different sources.

    In general one of the main reasons people buy BW is to compare different versions, especially in the original languages.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SiegfriedX View Post
    In general one of the main reasons people buy BW is to compare different versions, especially in the original languages.
    I'm not a General and I don't mind being a Pawn, but I think BW already does this more than quite nicely.

  10. #10
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    Default

    I don't believe that anyone has digitized the Greek of Brenton's LXX. I've only seen Rahlf's in digital form. An electronic version of the Göttingen LXX will be released in the forseeable future (you can do a Google search for more info).

    From what I've seen, folks in Biblical studies assume that when someone refers to Brenton's LXX that they are referring to the English translation alone. (Given that Rahlf's is the 'standard' one-volume version of the Greek LXX and that Brenton's used to be the only English translation that was easily accessible.*) So, I would not consider it improper at all for BibleWorks to advertise that they have Brenton's LXX and mean only the English translation.

    All that being said. If you know of anyone who's digitized Vaticanus in a form that is released to public domain (or with a really cheap license), then I'd venture that it could be incorporated into BW with a little elbow grease. BibleWorks does indeed excel at comparing versions (if there are in existence electronic versions to compare).

    *Note that there now several English translations of the LXX available for free on the web:

    • New English Translation of the Septuagint New English Translation of the Septuagint: Complete final Adobe Acrobat files of the 2007 translation of the LXX. See their introduction for an explanation on how translation proceeded.
    • Orthodox Study Bible Orthodox Study Bible (older site): Sample Adobe Acrobat files translations in progress.
    • Prophetologion Archimandrite Ephrem: Translation of the text of the Old Testament lectionary of the Eastern Orthodox Church
    • Sir Lancelot Brenton (1851) CCEL: HTML, Text Devoted to Truth: HTML, Text Ernie Marsh: HTML, Text. Apocryphal books, except 3 and 4 Macc are KJV. Online Bible: Module for the free Online Bible program Boston Christian Bible Study Resources: Module for the free Online Bible program
    • Brenton, revised Paul W. Esposito, editor and reviser of Brenton's translation. Titled The Apostle's [sic] Bible. Revision appears to be only slight, and covers only those books in the traditional Jewish/Protestant canon. Available online, or sold as a printed version through a third party. EOB: The Eastern/Greek Orthodox Bible. Orthodox revision of the translation of Brenton, with nearly 200 pp. of introductory material presenting Eastern Orthodox perspectives on Scripture. As of 2007, version is being revised. Includes call for volunteers.
    • Psalter Holy Transfiguration Monastery: HTML, arranged according to Orthodox kathismata. Translation taken from their 1974 translation.New Skete: HTML, arranged according to Orthodox kathismata. The translation is based essentially on the Hebrew, but has been modified somewhat to reflect LXX readings.
    • Thompson (1808) Charles Thompson, trans., The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Covenant, Commonly Called the Old and New Testament, Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, Volume 4. Google books.
    (The above links were copied from The Septuagint Online. Check out The Septuagint Online site for a host of links helpful for the study of the LXX - including links to various digital versions of the Greek LXX.)
    Jim Darlack - Associate Director of Goddard Library /
    Reference Librarian at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

    Gloucester Assembly of God | Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary
    The 'Unofficial' BibleWorks Blog | Old in the New | Facebook | LibraryThing

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