Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Ginsburg Massoretico-Critical Edition of the Hebrew Bible

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,206

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bkMitchell View Post

    So, Dr. James Price was on the BW forum? I am sure you did have some great discussions. You can find his book on syntax here(link).
    Brian, that looks like a great book. But, at $119.95, ouch!

    Quote Originally Posted by bkMitchell View Post
    Have you read any of the works by Rav Mordechai Breuer(of blessed memory), Aaron Dotan, or Joshua R. Jacobson's Chanting the Hebrew Bible?
    I've got Jacobson's book. Great resource.

    You know, I was a Torah reader in several synagogues in my previous life (No, I don't believe in reincarnation; just a figure of speech). I was a 'Ba'al qore'' (Torah Reader) for 15 years from the age of 13 (Bar Mitzvah) until I was 28. The Massoretic accents are a lot of fun. I don't think most people realize the extent to which they help us in exegesis. There are verses whose sense would be rendered completely differently by translators were it not for the Massoretic accents. They are akin to our English punctuation. That said, I'm not arguing for their inspiration; clearly, only the consonantal text of the Hebrew Bible is inspired. Nevertheless, they are helpful for interpretation.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    149

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by bkMitchell View Post
    You sure do have a nice collection of books on the subject.

    So, Dr. James Price was on the BW forum? I am sure you did have some great discussions. You can find his book on syntax here(link). Have you read any of the works by Rav Mordechai Breuer(of blessed memory), Aaron Dotan, or Joshua R. Jacobson's Chanting the Hebrew Bible?

    I guess we have gotten a little off topic but this is interesting and fun.
    I have Dotan's Biblia Hebraica Leningradensia here and he wrote the analytical table of contents and the list of identified sources and parallels in my print volumes of Ginsburg's Massorah. I have nothing by the other fellows here.

    Thanks for the link to Dr. Price's work. I always mean to buy it but end up buying other things like groceries. If I remember right, Dr. Price has other works on the subject as well.

    Another book that I have in my print library that is interesting is Israel Yeivin's Introduction to the Tiberian Massorah. I have the translation that E.J. Revell did on this work. I don't know if it is still in print or not and I've had my copy for a spell.

    Gotta go help my GF with her computer... type at you later!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ISalzman View Post
    Brian, that looks like a great book. But, at $119.95, ouch!



    I've got Jacobson's book. Great resource.

    You know, I was a Torah reader in several synagogues in my previous life (No, I don't believe in reincarnation; just a figure of speech). I was a 'Ba'al qore'' (Torah Reader) for 15 years from the age of 13 (Bar Mitzvah) until I was 28. The Massoretic accents are a lot of fun. I don't think most people realize the extent to which they help us in exegesis. There are verses whose sense would be rendered completely differently by translators were it not for the Massoretic accents. They are akin to our English punctuation. That said, I'm not arguing for their inspiration; clearly, only the consonantal text of the Hebrew Bible is inspired. Nevertheless, they are helpful for interpretation.
    Amen to that about the Massorah aiding in interpretation. If more people realized this, then they would incorporate it in their Hebrew studies. And the people that did their Hebrew studies using the Massorah could pass along that info to the folks that don't study in Hebrew.

    If I remember correctly, the Companion Bible by E.W. Bullinger made use of the Massorah that Ginsburg collated as did Rotherham's Emphasized Bible.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ISalzman View Post
    ... I was a 'Ba'al qore'' (Torah Reader) for 15 years from the age of 13 (Bar Mitzvah) until I was 28. The Massoretic accents are a lot of fun. I don't think most people realize the extent to which they help us in exegesis...
    Once a baal kriah always one. And you're right the Taamei HaMikra(accents) are of great importance for example that famous verse from Deuteronomy & the Passover Seder reads אֲרַמִּי אֹבֵד אָבִי either:


    1. "A Syrian ready to perish was my father," (Deu 26:5 KJV)
    2. "A wandering Aramean was my father"(Deu 26:5 JPS 1917)
    3. "An Aramean tried to kill my father"(Seder)

    All based on how one understand the accents. kind of interesting to say the least.


    Quote Originally Posted by MWMiles View Post
    ...Another book that I have in my print library that is interesting is Israel Yeivin's Introduction to the Tiberian Massorah. I have the translation that E.J. Revell did on this work. I don't know if it is still in print or not and I've had my copy for a spell.... type at you later!

    Yeah, That book is still in selling:
    Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (Masoretic Studies) $39.95
    at Amazon.com






    Last edited by bkMitchell; 01-04-2010 at 11:25 PM. Reason: I found out I can multiquote!
    Brian K. Mitchell
    חפשו בתורה היטב ואל תסתמכו על דברי
    http://www.adfontes.mitchellbk.com/


  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,206

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bkMitchell View Post
    Once a baal kriah always one. And you're right the Taamei HaMikra(accents) are of great importance for example that famous verse from Deuteronomy & the Passover Seder reads אֲרַמִּי אֹבֵד אָבִי either:


    1. "A Syrian ready to perish was my father," (Deu 26:5 KJV)
    2. "A wandering Aramean was my father"(Deu 26:5 JPS 1917)
    3. "An Aramean tried to kill my father"(Seder)

    All based on how one understand the accents. kind of interesting to say the least.
    Yes, very interesting. The Taamei HaMikra ("Trope" is my preferred term) group "'oved 'avi" together. Interesting though that JPS 1917 as well as JPS 1985 don't render the translation following the Trope.

    Another interesting verse is Genesis 24:34. "And he said, "I am the servant of Abraham" (my translation). But, without the benefit of the vowel pointing and accents, the verse could, in theory, be translated: "And the servant said, "I am Abraham."" Of course, if he said that, he might have become the first person ever convicted of identity theft!

  6. #26

    Default Dr. James D. Price Alive and Well

    I noticed this thread and saw that someone commented that James D. Price of Syntax of Massoretic Accents fame had passed away. This is not true. Dr. Price has a webpage at http://www.jamesdprice.com/

    Kevin W. Woodruff
    Prof. Kevin W. Woodruff, M. Div., M. S. I. S.
    Library Director/Reference Librarian, Assistant Professor of
    Bible and Greek, Theological Bibliography and Research
    Tennessee Temple University/Temple Baptist Seminary,
    1815 Union Ave.
    Chattanooga, Tennessee 37404, United States of America
    423/493-4252 (office) 423/493-4423 (home) 423/493-4497
    (FAX)
    woodruk@tntemple.edu Cierpke@prodigy.net
    http://pages.prodigy.net/cierpke/woodruff.htm

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin W. Woodruff View Post
    I noticed this thread and saw that someone commented that James D. Price of Syntax of Massoretic Accents fame had passed away. This is not true. Dr. Price has a webpage at http://www.jamesdprice.com/

    Kevin W. Woodruff
    I thought that I read somewhere (besides here) on the internet that Dr. Price had passed away. I'm glad that he is still with us, and thank you Kevin, for letting us know.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •