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Thread: Grammatical Phrasing or Sentence Flow layout

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  1. #1
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    Question Grammatical Phrasing or Sentence Flow layout

    I will often take time in my exegesis , especially of the Epistles, to lay out the thought of the passage in a “phrasing” or “sentence flow” format that leaves the main thoughts (subject/verb) on the left and indents supporting clauses and phrases. I describe or highlight grammatical or logical ties between the phrases. Sometimes I place these grammatical notes (in English) at the end of the line in parentheses. Other times I have used the MS Word Reviewer Comments to write notes about the grammatical constructions, which then appear in the markup on the right. In the attached example view from MS Word, I’ve done both.
    I also highlight terms on which I may need to do a word study, a cultural or geographical background study, or a doctrinal study.
    My question to others is how do you use features in the BW editor, MS Word, MS OneNote, etc. to create similar sentence flow diagrams?

    Sources:
    William Mounce, A Graded Reader of Biblical Greek (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996).
    Scot McKnight, “New Testament Greek Grammatical Analysis,” in Introducing New Testament Interpretation, ed. Scot McKnight (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1989).
    George H. Guthrie and J. Scott Duvall, Biblical Greek Exegesis (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1998)
    Bryan Smith, The Way of the Word Teacher’s Edition (Greenville: Bob Jones University Press, 2000)
    William Graham MacDonald, Syntactic and Thematic Greek Transcription of the New Testament (BibleWorks, 2008)
    William Graham MacDonald, Greek Enchiridion: A Concise Handbook of Grammar for Translation and Exegesis (BibleWorks, 2005)
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2

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    My use of MS Word is almost identical to yours.

    • I increase my right margin to 3 inches, giving more room for my Review Comments along the right-hand border
    • I decrease my tab to .25, decreasing the amount of space for phrase/clausal break downs
    • When my Review Comments along the right hand border start getting dense, I will insert call-outs, with the tip touching the word or phrase and the "bubble"? adding more info
    • I don't use "footnotes" - I don't like having to look at the bottom of the page, I prefer using Review Comments like you have
    • When working in the NT, I will pull-in the Leedy grammatical diagrams that come with Bible Works, for comparison's sake

    According to another thread, I think even more can be done in MS OneNote. I'm eventually going to head that way, but it's another learning curve and I've currently got more than several of those going at once right now.

  3. #3
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    Default Sentence flow diagram in OneNote?

    Part of my curiosity in posting the question above was to see if anyone was using MS OneNote for this type of diagramming. If so, what does it look like? How do you do it?

    Are there other internet sites, blogs, or forums that demonstrate these diagrams? I have seen them called "phrasing," "sentence flow diagram," "structural analysis," "semantic diagraming," "tracing the argument."

    Thank you for your response.
    Greg

  4. #4

    Default Diagramming

    I've posted a few times about diagramming and the various types. I have not used the Leedy diagrams much (these are the ones in BW7 and still in BW8), but the new MacDonald Greek Transcription in BW8 looks much more in line with the kind of work you are doing.
    Mark G. Vitalis Hoffman
    Professor of Biblical Studies
    Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
    ltsg.edu - CrossMarks.com
    Biblical Studies and Technological Tools

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Ward View Post
    Part of my curiosity in posting the question above was to see if anyone was using MS OneNote for this type of diagramming. If so, what does it look like? How do you do it?
    At this LINK is another link ("I'm the dude, playin' the dude disguised as another dude"*) with a video. Looks promising. If I had to guess, the end product could "look" very similar or somewhat different.

    It could look very similar if you want a "type writer" look when done, which is sort of what you and I have. Adding some color highlights or two and some referencing notations.

    It could look somewhat different if you started using a "pen." I have a wacom tablet, this would allow me to doodle some grammatical connections. Also, with the "insert anywhere you want feature," you could get real specific with your indents. But again, just how different, when all is said and done, would the end-product be? Seems to me its kind of like a genre. You have to play by certain conventions that will ultimately dictate similarity of end product.

    At quick glance, the biggest difference seems to be in the actual use of OneNote vs. Word to arrive at the final layout.

    I think I may just have to cut the Word umbilical cord for a while and try OneNote. Date it for a project or two. I don't think Word would mind. We're pretty good friends. Besides, spitzerpl has made a pretty good case.

    Scott

    *Quick, what movie is this line from?
    *For extra points, who might win an award for playing this dude?
    Last edited by SCSaunders; 01-19-2009 at 05:16 PM. Reason: I really need to pay more attention to those red squiggly underlines

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    For Hebrew, I prefer this style of layout:



    This provides me with a way that allows the comments to grow without disturbing the layout.

    Regards,
    David.
    Last edited by David Kummerow; 01-21-2009 at 12:18 AM.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Ward View Post
    Part of my curiosity in posting the question above was to see if anyone was using MS OneNote for this type of diagramming. If so, what does it look like? How do you do it?
    I love learning new tricks, but with OneNote - I'm an old dog.

    I've tried several times to switch over to OneNote, but I just can't do it. I'm too familiar with Word. I don't readily get OneNote. I'd rather invest "learning curve time" on other things. At least for now. Maybe I'll try again someday. It looks very powerful, but ... clock's tickin'.
    Last edited by SCSaunders; 01-21-2009 at 03:16 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Any already using OneNote for sentence diagrams?

    Mark,
    Thanks for the link to your reviews. I refer to the BW Leedy NT Diagrams and the MacDonald Greek Transciptions as aids when I'm trying to determine phrase and clause relations. Thanks for pointing out resources available in Libronix (Lexham and opentext.org syntax outlines). The Libronix training video on sentence outlines shows me that it has more graphical flexibility than a word processor, but I like to add in comment ballons. It doesn't seem to allow that--I'll have to experiment.

    SCSaunders,
    The previous OneNote discussion prompted me to start this thread, asking for examples of how others structure their grammitcal or syntactical flows. I'm curious if someone is already using OneNote to make sentence flow diagrams, and if so, how. It would save time on my learning curve too.

    David,
    Thanks for sharing your Hebrew study. That's a good format idea for longer narrative passages.

    I usually phrase outline Epistle paragraphs as I study through them. The grammatical or structural comments I place in comment balloons. Then on the next page of my exegesis template (not shown above) I place word definitions, cultural/geographical information, and theological comments.

    I've attached a MS Word version of my exegesis template. The basic structure came from a seminary friend a few years ago. The context questions come from Fee, NT Exegesis.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #9
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    Hi Greg,

    That seems a nice ordered way of doing things. Thanks for sharing a bit more.

    In my screen capture above, I missed seeing that the Hebrew had fallen back to the previous page. So here's a better example:



    Regards,
    David.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Ward View Post
    I've attached a MS Word version of my exegesis template. The basic structure came from a seminary friend a few years ago. The context questions come from Fee, NT Exegesis.
    Very nice Greg, very nice indeed. It appears to me that you don't miss a thing. Having said that, I missed the first time around that you have a legend for your color coding. Smart.

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