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Thread: Yom Zikaron and Yom Ha'atzma'ut

  1. #1

    Default Yom Zikaron and Yom Ha'atzma'ut

    Shalom,

    The Israeli Knesset established Iyyar 4, the day before Israel's Independence Day, as a Memorial Day for soldiers who gave up their lives in battle for the creation and defense of the State of Israel. In this way the Israeli government made it clear that without the sacrifice of the soldiers who gave their lives, there would be no Israeli state to celebrate.



    Eschatologically, Israel is the focal point of history, and this is perhaps a good time to remember to "pray for the peace of Jerusalem" (Psalm 122:6).

    www.hebrew4christians.com
    Last edited by John Parsons; 06-02-2005 at 04:14 PM.
    xyvmh [wvy ~vb ~wlv
    www.hebrew4christians.com

  2. #2

    Default

    John,

    I could be wrong, but it's less than clear to me that announcements of this nature are appropriate here.

    You wrote: "Eschatologically, Israel is the focal point of history ... "

    I really don't wish to start a discussion here, but please remember that for some of us, "Eschatologically, Jesus Christ is the focal point of history."

    John

  3. #3

    Thumbs up Parsons' pieces

    John, I appreciate your tidbits about Israel's culture and religion.

    I think Jesus Christ is the focal point of history, too, but I enjoy your stuff and want you to keep it coming.

    David McKay
    a bloke who once looked like a grandfather, and now is one.
    www.davidmckay.info

  4. #4

    Default Yom Zikaron and Yom Ha'atzma'ut

    John,

    I do not understand your purpose in the announcements that you make but I would like to.

    Roundtree.

  5. #5

    Default Jesus' Jewishness and Exegesis

    Nor do I wish to be polemic at all. My intention was simply to point out an important yet often overlooked ingredient when doing NT exegesis, to wit, that Jesus was (and is) a Jew who is returning to the land of Israel to be received as the Jewish Mashiach. If, as you say, Jesus is the focal point of your eschatology, I would think you would take these matters to heart.

    Since Israel's destiny is linked with the Church, it seems wise to learn more about God's plans for Israel.

    It's really that simple...

    - John Parsons



    Quote Originally Posted by J Kendall
    John,

    I could be wrong, but it's less than clear to me that announcements of this nature are appropriate here.

    You wrote: "Eschatologically, Israel is the focal point of history ... "

    I really don't wish to start a discussion here, but please remember that for some of us, "Eschatologically, Jesus Christ is the focal point of history."

    John
    xyvmh [wvy ~vb ~wlv
    www.hebrew4christians.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1

    Cool yom zikaron

    John anything dealing with the Moshiach is appropriate in bibleworks forum,if its not ,then this forum must deal with some other religion????
    It's refreshing to me to hear a fellow Follower of Moshiach pass on such important info ,as we all should be aware that these are the final hours before the birth pangs and that His Majesty Yeshua will rule the entire world from Israel!!!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Parsons
    Nor do I wish to be polemic at all. My intention was simply to point out an important yet often overlooked ingredient when doing NT exegesis, to wit, that Jesus was (and is) a Jew who is returning to the land of Israel to be received as the Jewish Mashiach.
    I, too, don't mind reading what you have to say, but from the point of view of being made aware of differing positions. In my view, the understanding that "Jesus ... is returning to the land of Israel" is a particular view not shared by all, which results from the application of a particular hermeneutic. In my (Sydney evangelical) circles, rarely do you find someone with this view. Anyway, my position is very much like:

    Robertson, O. Palmer. The Israel of God: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. Phillipsburg: P&R, 2000.

    David Kummerow.

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