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Y2K2
03-24-2005, 02:58 PM
Greetings,

I would like to make use of the Display Keyboard Key Maps in order to do a search of a Hebrew word in the TWOT. The difficulty is when both the Keyboard Key Maps and the TWOT is shown I cannot enter a search word in the TWOT.

The BW Hebrew Keyboard Map on p.190 of the user manual is helpful but not deisrable since you have to type with one hand and hold the manual open with the other.

What is the solution?

Thank you,

Roundtree.

Joe Fleener
03-25-2005, 10:36 PM
You could try one of the following options:

1. Right Click on the top of the Keyboard Map dialog and check "Make Desktop Window." This will allow you to see the Keyboard Map while looking at TWOT. However, you will still not be able to use it to type directly into the Lexicon browser.

2. The keyboard maps on in the online help. You could display those on the side of your scree while working in TWOT.

3. At one time I had photo copied the keyboard layouts from the manual and taped them to my desk near my keyboard.

Hope one of these helps.

Y2K2
03-26-2005, 04:38 AM
Thank you Joe for your reply. However, what is the intended way to type a Hebrew word in the search browser of TWOT?

Shalom,

Roundtree.

Joe Fleener
03-26-2005, 06:59 AM
I wasn't sure if you wanted something easier than holding the book open with one hand to use as a visual or to actually use the keyboard map to type searches in the lexicon window.

The second, unfortunately does not work as of now. However, I know this was requested very recently. If you sent another request for this function to support@bibleworks.com maybe it would get moved up the list a bit.

Y2K2
03-26-2005, 10:24 AM
Shalom Joe,

I have sent an email to BW support, as you suggested.

I appreciate your help and the websites that you have made.

Roundtree.

Charlie
03-28-2005, 04:45 PM
The keyboard dialog buttons were designed for use on the command line. It doesn't matter what window you open, the buttons will insert the character on the command line. They are necessary for some of our users who use their computer with a non-western European keyboard.

For the rest of us the dialog is unnecessary, we can simply type directly in Hebrew. See section 3.11.1 in the manual for the keyboard layout for Greek and Hebrew. It's designed to be easy to remember for anyone accustomed to a western European keyboard. For example to type ~yhla in the Hebrew lexicon dialog you would simply type alhym. It's much simpler than opening up the dialog and clicking buttons. Almost every character is exactly where you would expect it to be on the keyboard with only a few exceptions (ayin, tet, shin, & sin).

If you really would rather use the mouse and the keyboard dialog then you'll need to enter the word on the command line and perform the search. Then just mouse over the highlighted word in the first hit to read the TWOT entry in the Auto Info Window.

I hope that helps.

Y2K2
03-29-2005, 05:13 AM
Thank you Charlie for your reply. I had began reading The Font Map Dialog chapter 3.11.1 on page 190 instead of at its beginning on page 189. Now I know that the keyboard maps are only for typing on the Command Line. This is a surprise to me. Following your explanation a person accustomed to a Western keyboard does not need the keyboard dialog for either the Command Line or the search window in the TWOT. He can just type directly in Hebrew because he is accustomed to a Western keyboard. I have always typed using a Western keyboard and only now and then need to look at it. Evenso I do not find BW's Hebrew keyboard layout "easy to remember" except for the keys you mentioned. What about the 'het' which is typed using an X, and the 'zadi' which is typed using a C? For someone typing in Hebrew in BW on a daily basis maybe the keyboard layout is easy to remember but it is because of that and not because they are accustomed to a Western keyboard. Your suggestion of typing on the Command Line, performing a search, and then copying and pasting the search word in the TWOT is imaginative but...

Roundtree.

vr8ce
03-29-2005, 04:12 PM
... It's designed to be easy to remember for anyone accustomed to a western European keyboard. For example to type ~yhla in the Hebrew lexicon dialog you would simply type alhym. It's much simpler than opening up the dialog and clicking buttons. Almost every character is exactly where you would expect it to be on the keyboard with only a few exceptions (ayin, tet, shin, & sin).
I would have to add tzadi and kof to that list. I could add vav to the list, since I learned it as vav, not waw, but I'll give you that one. Although I think one of sin/shin more logically go on W since that's what they look like, and V could then be vav. But, hey, I'm no Hebrew scholar. :)

Vince

Mark Eddy
03-29-2005, 11:29 PM
I would have to add tzadi and kof to that list. I could add vav to the list, since I learned it as vav, not waw, but I'll give you that one. Although I think one of sin/shin more logically go on W since that's what they look like, and V could then be vav. But, hey, I'm no Hebrew scholar. :)

Vince

Since kof is always transliterated as a Q, it makes perfect sense to use that key for it. Whether you pronounce it waw or vav, the letter is also used for the holem, which is a long O, which is the omega in Greek, which looks like a W. So that's another reason to use that key for vav. Also the beth without a dagesh is often pronounced like a v, so an argument could be made for changing that too.
But I'll leave it the people who are putting a unicode Hebrew font together to decide what will be the standard key stroke for these letters. We may have to re-learn a few keystrokes, but I have found that it takes only a few lines of typing to learn what the odd keys are, at least for the consonants. Vowel points and accents are a different story.
Yom tob.
Mark Eddy