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vr8ce
12-01-2004, 12:18 PM
I wanted to do a search today looking for a couple of words in order in a single verse. Not a phrase search, just verses with word1 *before* word2 (they don't have to be together).

I tried a few things on the command line, re-read the command-line and search help entries, but nothing worked.

I tried <.word1 * word2>, but it ignored the order. I tried <.word1*word2>, but it took it as all one word. <'word1 word2> obviously works, but only as a phrase, i.e. it doesn't find any occurences where word2 follows word1 in the same verse, but with other words in between.

So, is this possible on the command line?

Thanks,

Vince

Joe Fleener
12-01-2004, 12:42 PM
<'word1 word2> obviously works, but only as a phrase, i.e. it doesn't find any occurences where word2 follows word1 in the same verse, but with other words in between.

So, is this possible on the command line?

Thanks,

Vince
On the command line:

<'word1 *99 word2>

The *99 could be any number. The *# means "up to that number." So I picked a large enough number that I new would cover an entire verse (I don't think there are any verses with more than 99 words.

This gives me word1 followed by word2 anywhere within the verse.

Hope that helps.

vr8ce
12-01-2004, 01:34 PM
On the command line:

<'word1 *99 word2>

The *99 could be any number. The *# means "up to that number." So I picked a large enough number that I new would cover an entire verse (I don't think there are any verses with more than 99 words.

This gives me word1 followed by word2 anywhere within the verse.

Hope that helps.
Ah, great, thanks, Joe. (Could that sentence have more commas?) After your reply, I finally found some examples in the Help that talk about this (cleverly hidden in the command line help instead of the Search help; note to BW, for people that don't where things are, it makes a lot more sense to put all of your search examples in one place, because "search" is what we're going to go looking for when we need help on Searching).

And, I (re?)discovered that BW speaks regex. If I knew that I had forgotten it.

Vince

Joe Fleener
12-02-2004, 06:55 AM
I finally found some examples in the Help that talk about this (cleverly hidden in the command line help instead of the Search help; note to BW, for people that don't where things are, it makes a lot more sense to put all of your search examples in one place, because "search" is what we're going to go looking for when we need help on Searching).


Just a guess, but the BW folks may have put the search examples under the command line section for "context sensitive help." I know for me if I am looking for help on how to do something, I place my cursor over the location on the screen and hit F1.

So yes, even though I am doing a search to get to the help, I place my cursor over the command line (since that is where I am working) and hit F1. This takes me to the command line help and as I scroll down I find the search examples.

It may make sense to leave the examples where they are, but rename the page to “Search Examples” rather than “Command Line Examples,” since as you mention most people are going to be thinking “search” when they go looking for the information.

- Just my 2 cents

vr8ce
12-02-2004, 05:30 PM
Just a guess, but the BW folks may have put the search examples under the command line section for "context sensitive help." I know for me if I am looking for help on how to do something, I place my cursor over the location on the screen and hit F1.
...

Yeah, but the two problems I see with that are:
1. You have to page down several times to get to those examples, and they're labelled "Some Simple Examples", which gives no clues to someone without a clue who's skimming to find what they're looking for. So even if someone does what you describe (and I in fact did it as well, so it does make sense), we're not going to find what we're looking for.
2. It doesn't help the people who search for "Search" to find help on "Search".

So, I would do one of two things:
1. Put a link on the Command Line help to the Search, and move those examples to the Search page, or
2. Add the examples from Command Line help to the Search page, or (did I say two, I meant three :) )
3. Leave the command-line examples where they are, rename the title of the "Some Simple Examples" to "Simple Search Examples", and add it to the index for "Search", i.e. list is as another sub-section under the "Search" heading in the index.

Of the three, I would prefer #1, as it puts all of the search examples in one place, and it allows people doing command-line context searches to easily find what they're looking for as well.

I would also either eliminate the "Using the Command-Line in Beginner Mode" section (the first line says "In Beginning mode, there is no command line."), or move it to the bottom, on the argument that the reason we're looking up command line help is because we need... help on the command line. :) So move the information we *need* to the top (same reason the option exists in BW to move the Hebrew article definitions to the bottom of the auto-info window).

My nickel's worth (not to imply it's worth more than your two cents worth, it's just longer :) ).

Vince

Joe Fleener
12-02-2004, 06:58 PM
1. Put a link on the Command Line help to the Search, and move those examples to the Search page, or
2. Add the examples from Command Line help to the Search page, or (did I say two, I meant three :) )
3. Leave the command-line examples where they are, rename the title of the "Some Simple Examples" to "Simple Search Examples", and add it to the index for "Search", i.e. list is as another sub-section under the "Search" heading in the index.

Of the three, I would prefer #1, as it puts all of the search examples in one place, and it allows people doing command-line context searches to easily find what they're looking for as well.

My nickel's worth (not to imply it's worth more than your two cents worth, it's just longer :) ).

Vince
I second your option #1!