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cgrebe
06-13-2012, 02:13 PM
After searching around my sense is that the answer is no, but does BibleWorks include the BHS critical apparatus anywhere?

שלום,
Charles Grebe
www.animatedhebrew.com

MBushell
06-13-2012, 03:26 PM
After searching around my sense is that the answer is no, but does BibleWorks include the BHS critical apparatus anywhere?

שלום,
Charles Grebe
www.animatedhebrew.com (http://www.animatedhebrew.com)

Not currently. We are in discussions with GBS but nothing has been worked out yet. If we are able to get it, it would have to be an addon module because of the royalty costs.
Mike

ISalzman
06-13-2012, 05:21 PM
Hey Mike, that would be great. I hope it works out. For my part, I would be willing to pay for the add-on module. Definitely worth it in my opinion. By the way, would it be Quinta or Stuttgartensia?

AbramKJ
09-03-2012, 11:02 AM
Thought this would be worth reviving and asking if anyone (BibleWorks staff, especially) is able to comment on whether GBS has worked something out with BibleWorks? I'd pay for an add-on module (if reasonable) of both BHS and BHQ--both are available in Accordance right now. I'm tempted to just pull the trigger and get it there, but want to wait a bit first and see if it's something to expect in BibleWorks any time soon.

By the way, while I'm here, I want to add: for as useful as NA28 could be, the CNNTS apparatus is amazingly included in the BibleWorks package, as well as those tasty manuscript images. I don't see any need for the NA28 apparatus, certainly--the text could be nice, but I don't think it's a huge deal.

Text criticism tools for the Hebrew Bible, on the other hand... would love to see more of those! :)

MBushell
09-04-2012, 07:32 PM
Thought this would be worth reviving and asking if anyone (BibleWorks staff, especially) is able to comment on whether GBS has worked something out with BibleWorks? I'd pay for an add-on module (if reasonable) of both BHS and BHQ--both are available in Accordance right now. I'm tempted to just pull the trigger and get it there, but want to wait a bit first and see if it's something to expect in BibleWorks any time soon.

By the way, while I'm here, I want to add: for as useful as NA28 could be, the CNNTS apparatus is amazingly included in the BibleWorks package, as well as those tasty manuscript images. I don't see any need for the NA28 apparatus, certainly--the text could be nice, but I don't think it's a huge deal.

Text criticism tools for the Hebrew Bible, on the other hand... would love to see more of those! :)

All I can tell you is that we made a proposal some time ago and have not gotten a response. You could put a bug in the GBS ear if you want.

It is hard to get information but I am not sure that there is any difference between the NA27 and NA28 text. As far as I know the changes are in print presentation and apparatus. But I could be wrong about that. It is hard to get definitive answers.

Mike

Michael Hanel
09-04-2012, 08:30 PM
It is hard to get information but I am not sure that there is any difference between the NA27 and NA28 text. As far as I know the changes are in print presentation and apparatus. But I could be wrong about that. It is hard to get definitive answers.

Mike

The difference in text between NA27 and NA28 is really not significant. The text is same in all places except the Catholic Epistles, and even then there are only 34 places (http://www.nestle-aland.com/en/the-28-edition/revision-of-the-catholic-letters/)where the text is different. And most of those changes look like they're minor - it looks like some of them were already bracketed readings, others have been well marked in the apparatus by a close balance of witnesses. In other words, the new readings aren't "new", they're just a change of opinion of what reading belongs in the text vs. the apparatus.

You can get a pretty good idea of what the new readings are if you go to Wieland's website (http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/ECM/ECM-index.html). But his list will not yet be the same as the NA28. He highlights the corrected readings in red font based on the first edition of the Editio Critica Maior. The NA28 will be based on the 2nd edition, which actually will be published AFTER the NA28 is released (as far as I know). [For instance the official NA28 website says that the NA28 reading will say ὄντως at 2 Pe 2:18, but Wieland's website says that the first edition of the ECM printed the reading ὀλίγως while noting in the apparatus that ὄντως is an alternate reading.]

I know when it comes to textual crit stuff, people can have very sharp opinions, but unless you are someone publishing in the scholarly field, I don't know that you really need to rush to buy the NA28.

ISalzman
09-04-2012, 11:17 PM
On a related topic - though OT criticism, of course - I must say that I find BHQ (Biblia Hebraica Quinta) to be thoroughly refreshing and a breath of fresh air.

Irving

Lee
09-04-2012, 11:49 PM
On a related topic - though OT criticism, of course - I must say that I find BHQ (Biblia Hebraica Quinta) to be thoroughly refreshing and a breath of fresh air.

Irving

Interesting . . . How so?

ISalzman
09-05-2012, 12:14 PM
Hey Lee, to use the words of a professor of mine, BHQ is like the "Cadillac" of apparati. Much easier to follow than the BHS Apparatus. Much more English than Latin. In addition, it deciphers the Masorah. Big improvement, in my estimation. I hear that Oxford University Press is also working on an apparatus of their own. Till now, this has been the exclusive domain and work of the German Bible Society.

Lee
09-05-2012, 03:21 PM
Hey Lee, to use the words of a professor of mine, BHQ is like the "Cadillac" of apparati. Much easier to follow than the BHS Apparatus. Much more English than Latin. In addition, it deciphers the Masorah. Big improvement, in my estimation. I hear that Oxford University Press is also working on an apparatus of their own. Till now, this has been the exclusive domain and work of the German Bible Society.

Irving,

Thanks for the reply and info. I've read a few blurbs here and there about BHQ, but wasn't sure what set it apart from BHS to that degree. You mention Oxford's apparatus . . . is Hebrew University's Bible going to leave off producing an apparatus?

ISalzman
09-05-2012, 06:25 PM
Irving,

Thanks for the reply and info. I've read a few blurbs here and there about BHQ, but wasn't sure what set it apart from BHS to that degree. You mention Oxford's apparatus . . . is Hebrew University's Bible going to leave off producing an apparatus?

Hey Lee, I believe the Hebrew University Bible will have an apparatus too.

bkMitchell
09-07-2012, 07:49 PM
Hey Lee, I believe the Hebrew University Bible will have an apparatus too.

You're right Isalzman, and there is more to this than belief since the three volumes that have been produced prove that an apparatus is included. And, let us also not forget about the MGHaKeter project it's great too!

As, for the BHQ check out this article(It includes page samples)
http://rosetta.reltech.org/TC/vol07/Weis2002.html

The published volumes of the BHQ are already available in two different electronic formats, hopefully BibleWorks will also be able acquire a license to this as well. Not, only is the apparatus much improved, but the full Massorah is included, and a sort commentary on it and the apparatus.

the Author of the Ancient Hebrew Poetry blog, John F. Hobbins, has also published an article on the BHQ in comparison with the other projects out there:
http://ancienthebrewpoetry.typepad.com/ancient_hebrew_poetry/files/whither_biblia_hebraica_quinta.pdf

ISalzman
09-18-2012, 11:19 AM
Another very interesting feature of Quinta - that the BHS Apparatus did/does not do - is that the editors of the BHQ give you the reasons why, they believe, the variants arose. In other words, they attempt to explain the reasoning behind them. This makes for a rather nice feature. (I have been working more and more with BHQ, and am, thus, becoming more familiar with it.)

Lee
09-18-2012, 12:01 PM
Another very interesting feature of Quinta - that the BHS Apparatus did/does not do - is that the editors of the BHQ give you the reasons why, they believe, the variants arose. In other words, they attempt to explain the reasoning behind them. This makes for a rather nice feature. (I have been working more and more with BHQ, and am, thus, becoming more familiar with it.)

That is very interesting. If you'll excuse my using the Greek NT to illustrate, that would be as if Metzger's Textual Commentary were included right in the UBS apparatus itself.

Adelphos
09-18-2012, 12:23 PM
Just in case others might like to know this, the Masorah of BHS/BHQ is a radically different Masorah than was employed by Bomberg/Ben Chayyim. The Masorah of BHQ is based wholly on the Leningrad Codex and was begun by Gerard E. Weil.

Weil was forced in numerous places to insert conjectural emendation because the Masorah of the Leningrad Codex was too slovenly written and too unclear and haphazzard to make a definitive reading. I don't know if the current BHQ Masorah has undergone further emendations, alterations since Weil's time, or what-have-you, only that permission has been granted by the UBS and Pontifical Biblical Institute of Rome to continue the work.

In short, everyone should know that the Masorah is not a monolithic corpus that all agree on. Quite the opposite. The BHQ may be very well organized after making some sense out of much that is difficult to make sense of in the Leningrad Codex, but it represents far and away only one viewpoint.

Michael Hanel
09-18-2012, 12:32 PM
In short, everyone should know that the Masorah is not a monolithic corpus that all agree on. Quite the opposite. The BHQ may be very well organized after making some sense out of much that is difficult to make sense of in the Leningrad Codex, but it represents far and away only one viewpoint.

In other words, there needs to be a critical apparatus/edition for the Masorah too?

Adelphos
09-18-2012, 12:40 PM
In other words, there needs to be a critical apparatus/edition for the Masorah too?

Don't hold your breath. That would be a decades-long work at the very minimum, and even then you'd have find somebody who was actually willing to undertake it. And digging up the Bomberg/Ben Chayyim stuff would take a researcher par excellance.

ISalzman
09-18-2012, 12:46 PM
That is very interesting. If you'll excuse my using the Greek NT to illustrate, that would be as if Metzger's Textual Commentary were included right in the UBS apparatus itself.

Yes, Lee. Nowhere near as detailed as Metzger, of course. They give a very brief explanation. But still a nice feature.