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Joan Korte
07-06-2011, 04:49 PM
From the product page on the BWorks website, in BW9 the following Bible versions will have newer editions:

NIV 2011
Holman Christian Standard Bible 2nd edition
Common English Bible, 2011
New American Bible, revised edition
NLT 2nd edition

I understand that they are the latest editions and that may be the entire reason BWorks is including them in BW9. However, what I am wondering--is there some significant text critical or exegetical reason or something else to note? (I think the Common English Bible is new.)

Mark Eddy
07-06-2011, 11:35 PM
From the product page on the BWorks website, in BW9 the following Bible versions will have newer editions:

I understand that they are the latest editions and that may be the entire reason BWorks is including them in BW9. However, what I am wondering--is there some significant text critical or exegetical reason or something else to note? (I think the Common English Bible is new.)
To get the full answer to this, you would have to check with each publisher. Their introductions may or may not tell you the reasons for the updates. They may or may not tell you, if you ask them, why they replace the old text with the new instead of selling both. The supposition is that the publishers really think that the updated version is somehow better.
NIV has been playing around for a decade with "gender neutral" language. Their attemps have stirred up a firestorm. Apparently they think that the new NIV has reached a happy medium. For owners of BW8 (and previous), you get to keep the old NIV (NIVO), so you can compare and decide for yourself. New purchasers will not have that option legally.

Holman Christian Standard Bible 2nd edition
I think that for HCSB, if you own BW8 you get to keep the old CSB (CSBO) and get the new CSB too.

Common English Bible, 2011
You are correct that CEB is brand new to BibleWorks.

New American Bible, revised edition
The same is true for NAB (and NABO) as for CSB.

NLT 2nd edition
The NLB 2nd ed. actually came out as a patch for BW8. If you first exported the old NLB and renamed it, you could download the new NLB and have both versions to compare (discussion was made about this in these forums). But, if you just applied the patch, your old NLB is gone, unless you uninstall BW8, then re-install it from the disk, then export the NLB and rename it. It is somewhat time-consuming, but if you really want the old NLB, that would be the legal way to do it.
Mark Eddy

Michael Hanel
07-07-2011, 10:39 AM
Mark gave a good answer to your question, Joan. The answer I would have given regarding the updated version of versions that BibleWorks used to contain (NIV, NAB, HCSB, etc.) is simply that those are the versions that the licensors are distributing. It doesn't mean they're better (though they might be) or worse (though they might be). It just means that BibleWorks' choice wasn't between including the NIV 2011 or the NIV 1984, their choice was between including the NIV 2011 or not. The NIV 1984 isn't on the table any longer. (The exception is if you're upgrading from a previous version of BibleWorks, then you'll still be able to keep the old texts.)

To say anything more about the exact nature of the translations themselves, whether they are in and of themselves good or bad is really more of an "off-topic" discussion as it doesn't directly pertain to BibleWorks and depending on people's opinions, it could get quite contentious.

Joan Korte
07-07-2011, 12:01 PM
My question was only about why BWorks was going with the latest editions, and if the fact they were was solely because they are the latest editions and not for other reasons. Now, I know. Thanks!

MBushell
07-07-2011, 01:15 PM
My question was only about why BWorks was going with the latest editions, and if the fact they were was solely because they are the latest editions and not for other reasons. Now, I know. Thanks!
Hi Joan,

All of our licenses are for a specific text and limited to a specific period of time. When our licenses expire, we have to hegotiate a renewal. In many cases the publisher requires us to distribute only the latest version and cease distributing the old version. We always give the user the maximum flexibility permitted by our licenses. So the basic anser to your question is that our actions are determined by contractual requirements.

The endless flood of new English versions and new editions of old versions is as frustrating for us as it is our users. There seems to be no end in sight. I do not think that it is good for the church or the cause of the gospel.

To answer your question, the changes are not for the most part due to text critical considerations. They are driven by market forces and differences in translation philosophy.

Mike