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ISalzman
12-11-2010, 08:54 AM
After a six year run with my old Windows XP computer, I am finally planning on upgrading computers and to Windows 7 Home Premium Edition. Are there any issues that I need to be aware of as concerns BibleWork's operation and performance? Grateful for any responses.

bobvenem
12-11-2010, 09:29 AM
No problems at all.

Michael Hanel
12-11-2010, 09:46 AM
Same as Bob. I haven't ever had any issues.

jthomp
12-11-2010, 11:14 AM
Same here! I'm running BW8 on two Win7 platforms -- 32 bit & 64 bit and no problems....

ISalzman
12-11-2010, 02:56 PM
Thanks all. That's encouraging. As to 32-bit or 64-bit, I've been made to understand that Windows 7 Premium Home Edition is 64-bit. When I was ordering the computer, the sales rep wanted to know if I wanted Windows 7 Professional or Home. When I asked the difference between the two, the sales rep told me that Windows 7 Professional can run in both environments (32 and 64-bit). I was told that some older Windows programs only run in 32-bit, in which case I'd be up the creek with Windows 7 Home Premium Edition. Since BibleWorks 8 is not overly old, I guessed it would be able to function correctly in a 64-bit environment. Your responses so far seem to affirm that. I have been using Windows XP since it was first released until these very key strokes. But I'm hoping not to have any problems with the new operating system and computer when I receive it.

By the way, is there a big learning curve ahead of me, transitioning from Windows XP to Windows 7? When I first turn it on, I won't be asking myself "What now?" will I? I surely hope that it will be pretty intuitive and easy to figure out?

Michael Hanel
12-11-2010, 03:11 PM
Thanks all. That's encouraging. As to 32-bit or 64-bit, I've been made to understand that Windows 7 Premium Home Edition is 64-bit. When I was ordering the computer, the sales rep wanted to know if I wanted Windows 7 Professional or Home. When I asked the difference between the two, the sales rep told me that Windows 7 Professional can run in both environments (32 and 64-bit). I was told that some older Windows programs only run in 32-bit, in which case I'd be up the creek with Windows 7 Home Premium Edition. Since BibleWorks 8 is not overly old, I guessed it would be able to function correctly in a 64-bit environment. Your responses so far seem to affirm that. I have been using Windows XP since it was first released until these very key strokes. But I'm hoping not to have any problems with the new operating system and computer when I receive it.

By the way, is there a big learning curve ahead of me, transitioning from Windows XP to Windows 7? When I first turn it on, I won't be asking myself "What now?" will I? I surely hope that it will be pretty intuitive and easy to figure out?

The 32 vs. 64 bit is a bit of a sticky point. The bottom line is that BW8 will work fine in a 64bit version of Windows 7, but it will be run as a 32bit program. There are certain programs that will have .EXEs made for a 64bit processor and then you can take advantage of those. For the regular user, there really won't be much a of a difference between 32 and 64. For the power user there are certain tasks which can take advantage of the 64 bit processor (e.g. the 64 bit version of Excel is much faster at processing ginormous spreadsheets).

My only caveat on Windows 7, the only problem I had, is that some of my old equipment (I had a printer from college) no longer worked natively in Windows 7 because the company ceased updating drivers for it. Luckily my sister had a newer printer she was getting rid of so I upgraded to that and wasn't out anything, otherwise it would have been very frustrating. I am told you can still use old equipment in Windows 7 by using its "Windows XP virtual machine" mode, but I never wanted to play around with that. There are various websites out there where you can see if your equipment provides drivers for Windows 7. Otherwise you'll have to experiment when you have it in hand.

Windows 7 is quite a bit different in my opinion than Windows XP. However I don't think the learning curve is impossible. Things might be rearranged a bit differently or whatever, but overall I'm pleased with the changes. As is the case, I think you'll figure it out quite quickly just by using it. Sometimes it's overkill to try to explain it. Suffice to say, Windows 7 has a more Mac feel to it.

ISalzman
12-11-2010, 04:10 PM
Thanks Michael. Would you say it would be worth my while to purchase something like a Windows 7 training DVD or a Windows 7 for Dummies type of a book?

RandomSF
12-11-2010, 04:35 PM
I have helped many people convert from XP to Windows 7 and none have felt the need for a book. The similarities between the two are sufficient to get started right out of the box, and supplemented with an article or two on the new features of Windows 7 that you can find on the Internet, you should be well-equipped.

Michael Hanel
12-11-2010, 04:41 PM
Thanks Michael. Would you say it would be worth my while to purchase something like a Windows 7 training DVD or a Windows 7 for Dummies type of a book?

I find giving tech advice is really difficult. For instance, if I showed my parents Windows 7, they'd probably be completely lost because it looks different and things they used to do aren't exactly the same. I might feel the same thing, but I would still poke around and figure it out. My advice is that you wouldn't need any training tools, but be prepared for it to look and feel a bit different. Everyone's mileage varies.

ISalzman
12-12-2010, 10:49 AM
I have helped many people convert from XP to Windows 7 and none have felt the need for a book. The similarities between the two are sufficient to get started right out of the box, and supplemented with an article or two on the new features of Windows 7 that you can find on the Internet, you should be well-equipped.

Thanks Random. Do you have the links to any particular internet articles you might have in mind? If not, don't sweat it; I can always Google it. But some websites are better than others. I just thought if you had a couple of articles in mind, I would ask you about them. Thanks.

ISalzman
12-12-2010, 11:02 AM
I find giving tech advice is really difficult. For instance, if I showed my parents Windows 7, they'd probably be completely lost because it looks different and things they used to do aren't exactly the same. I might feel the same thing, but I would still poke around and figure it out. My advice is that you wouldn't need any training tools, but be prepared for it to look and feel a bit different. Everyone's mileage varies.

Thanks Michael. I am sometimes leery of poking around in an exploratory fashion. I don't like to disrupt the environment or make detrimental changes to the system that I can't later undo. Or, at least, don't know how to undo. I'd love to be able to poke around on someone else's PC, if you know what I mean. Maybe I can go down to the local Best Buy and play around on one of their floor samples. But, alas, I think they are usually password-protected.

I remember when Windows 95 transitioned to Windows 98. The two were so similar, there was barely any learning curve involved at all. I found the same thing going from Windows 98 to Windows XP (though I skipped Windows 2000 and Windows ME). If memory serves me, I believe past Windows operating systems usually included a flash video tour of the features new to the new operating system. They usually appeared on the Welcome Screen when you first set up your newly purchased PC out of the box. I assume Windows 7 would be no different in this regard? Would I be correct to believe that there will probably be a video tour that comes in Windows 7 on the new computer? I have a very high tech friend who has always answered my questions about new operating systems in the past and who has always helped my transitioning to new operating systems. But, alas, about two-three years ago, he finally made the switch to a Mac, so he won't be of any help this time around.

RandomSF
12-12-2010, 12:54 PM
If you are already familiar with XP, do a search on Windows 7 Tips and Tricks and you will find enough to show the differences. These articles will be highlighting the differences.

ISalzman
12-12-2010, 01:29 PM
Thanks Random, will do.

bkMitchell
12-13-2010, 09:03 PM
After a six year run with my old Windows XP computer, I am finally planning on upgrading computers and to Windows 7 Home Premium Edition. Are there any issues that I need to be aware of as concerns BibleWork's operation and performance? Grateful for any responses.

Hello ISalzman,

I have been running BibleWorks 8 on Windows 7 for little over a year now. The only time I had any difficulties was when I ran BW8 on Window7 starter on my netbook, but I quickly upgraded to Windows Premium and then everything has been fine since then.

On my home PC I use Windows 7 ultimate and I haven't had any issues with it, at least not that I am aware of.

This is not really an issue, but BibleWorks windows and bars are rendered differently in Windows 7 than they are in Windows XP. For, me Bibleworks cosmetically looks like a different program with any of the Areo themes or with the Windows 7 basics theme.

Here are a few links that may be of interest:
How Can I Prepare BibleWorks to Run in Windows Vista or Windows 7? http://kb.bibleworksllc.com/ikb/questions.php?questionid=72


Category BibleWorks, Vista & Windows 7
http://kb.bibleworksllc.com/ikb/categories.php?categoryid=24

Grace and Peace,
Brian

bobvenem
12-14-2010, 06:22 AM
1. Don't worry about poking around in Windows 7; it's pretty much idiot-proof (speaking from too much experience)

2. The virtual platform for older programs works pretty good, though weird stuff can happen when the old software starts (I have a .wav editor that runs only in 16 colors; very strange-looking).

3. BW8 ran fine on my netbook with Windows 7 Starter, though it is quite slow (the processor, not the software).

ISalzman
12-14-2010, 11:27 AM
Brian, todah chaver.

Irving

ISalzman
12-14-2010, 11:35 AM
1. Don't worry about poking around in Windows 7; it's pretty much idiot-proof (speaking from too much experience)



Thanks Bob. Your use of the word "idiot-proof" triggered a funny memory for me. Back in the mid-nineties, when Windows 95 launched, I went with a colleague of mine down to the local 'Staples' store. We were both perusing the "techie" book rack there, and spotted two different books: 'Windows 95 for Dummies' and 'The Idiot's Guide to Windows 95.' (I kid you not; this is a true story!) My colleague was thumbing through both books and couldn't make up his mind as to which he thought would be better for him. After a couple of moments, one of the Staples sales staff entered our immediate vicinity and my colleague called him over and asked: "Excuse me, but which of these two books do you think would be better for me?" The Staples staffer leaned back and looked my friend up and down from head to toe very deliberately. Finally, he said, "You look more like an idiot to me!" I doubled over in laughter and have not forgotten that to this day! Ah, for memories, huh?

Dan Phillips
12-14-2010, 06:44 PM
Late to the dance, but: running BW8 on a Windows 7 laptop and a Windows 7 64-bit desktop. Not a tick of trouble with either.

bobvenem
12-15-2010, 05:19 AM
After a couple of moments, one of the Staples sales staff entered our immediate vicinity and my colleague called him over and asked: "Excuse me, but which of these two books do you think would be better for me?" The Staples staffer leaned back and looked my friend up and down from head to toe very deliberately. Finally, he said, "You look more like an idiot to me!" I doubled over in laughter and have not forgotten that to this day! Ah, for memories, huh?

Thousands of salesmen out of work, and you got a comedian. Great story.

ISalzman
12-15-2010, 09:57 AM
Late to the dance, but: running BW8 on a Windows 7 laptop and a Windows 7 64-bit desktop. Not a tick of trouble with either.

Thanks Dan.

ISalzman
12-15-2010, 09:57 AM
Thousands of salesmen out of work, and you got a comedian. Great story.

I always chuckle when I'm reminded of it.