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benelchi
04-02-2010, 01:57 PM
Does anyone know a way to search for verb/subject mismatches, for example a masculine verb that has a feminine subject. In reading I see these occasionally, but I cannot remember any of the verses where I have seen this in the past right now.

ISalzman
04-02-2010, 04:35 PM
Does anyone know a way to search for verb/subject mismatches, for example a masculine verb that has a feminine subject. In reading I see these occasionally, but I cannot remember any of the verses where I have seen this in the past right now.

Great question. I can't supply the answer unfortunately. I'll defer to some of the more savvy power users here. However, I suspect that a search such as this would be immeasurably aided by a tool such as the Anderson-Forbes tagged databases, which tag words according to their function in the sentence (i.e., subject, object, etc.).

But I can tell you that Gen 28:22 provides an instance of the gender disagreement between a noun subject and its attendant verb. In this case the feminine noun אֶבֶן is paired with the masculine verb יִהְיֶה. By the way, this should not be perceived to be a grammatical error on the part of the biblical author. Rather, it should force us to ask the right exegetical questions. There was intention behind the author's use of the masculine verb here.

Michael Hanel
04-02-2010, 04:44 PM
Great question. I can't supply the answer unfortunately. I'll defer to some of the more savvy power users here. However, I suspect that a search such as this would be immeasurably aided by a tool such as the Anderson-Forbes tagged databases, which tag words according to their function in the sentence (i.e., subject, object, etc.).



Irving is basically right here. In BW you could not really find this information in a way that is quick or easy. Because the tagging in the Westminster database is not syntactic, you'd essentially have to search for feminine verbs and masculine nouns/pronouns and then do another search including the opposite and then cull that list to see which of those hits really demonstrate what you're looking for. That is possible to do, but I'm not sure you'd want to take the time to do it. So the short answer is, you really can't do it unless you have access to a Hebrew syntactic database.

Adelphos
04-02-2010, 07:58 PM
Actually, depending on the variables you want, you can do a lot within BW in this regard. You must use the GSE and employ the agreement box to specify your settings, but this allows you a great deal of flexibility.

Take a look at GSE searches using the agreement box. Also, to get the most functionality, make sure you are using morphological versions in the GSE.

ISalzman
04-02-2010, 08:07 PM
Actually, depending on the variables you want, you can do a lot within BW in this regard. You must use the GSE and employ the agreement box to specify your settings, but this allows you a great deal of flexibility.

Take a look at GSE searches using the agreement box. Also, to get the most functionality, make sure you are using morphological versions in the GSE.

Scott, first, good to see you see on the forums again! (See my post in the Non-BibleWorks section of the forums) I don't doubt what you say. I think the GSE is probably very powerful and has great capabilities. I must, unfortunately, confess to it being my least mastered area of BibleWorks. And I think the same is probably true for many, if not most BW users. I wish there was more training or more training videos available on the GSE.

Sansom48
04-02-2010, 09:08 PM
Scott, first, good to see you see on the forums again! (See my post in the Non-BibleWorks section of the forums) I don't doubt what you say. I think the GSE is probably very powerful and has great capabilities. I must, unfortunately, confess to it being my least mastered area of BibleWorks. And I think the same is probably true for many, if not most BW users. I wish there was more training or more training videos available on the GSE.

I have to agree with this, although I am by no means a master when it comes to BW, one of the most powerful tools it has the GSE, I find myself lacking on. however, lately I have been working my way through the help contents in hopes that I will be able to make better use of this wonderful program.

benelchi
04-05-2010, 10:57 PM
Actually, depending on the variables you want, you can do a lot within BW in this regard. You must use the GSE and employ the agreement box to specify your settings, but this allows you a great deal of flexibility.

Take a look at GSE searches using the agreement box. Also, to get the most functionality, make sure you are using morphological versions in the GSE.

I have never used the GSE before, but I am looking into this. So far I still haven't found a way to do this search.


Note: I did however find one more occurrence i.e. Duet. 22:23

ISalzman
04-06-2010, 07:41 AM
Note: I did however find one more occurrence i.e. Duet. 22:23

Hard to say if that exactly qualifies as an example. The masculine verb yihyeh there is being used more in the sense of "If there should ever come to pass ...," rather than as the verb controlled by the feminine subject there (na'ara).

Mark Eddy
04-07-2010, 12:01 AM
Since BibleWorks does not include a database which tags nouns as subjects or objects, as others said, you cannot search for exactly what you want. However, you can do some searches which will cut down on the number of verses you might have to look at in order to find what you want. For example, if you want to find a few verses with a masculine subject but a femine verb you could use WTM as the search version and type on the command line: .*@n*m* *@v*f* !*@[an]*[fb]* !*@v*m*
This will look for all verses which have a masculine noun and a feminine verb but no adjectives or nouns which are either feminine or "both" and no verbs which are masculine.
The problem with this is that certain proper nouns are names of women but are not listed as feminine in WTM. Also a feminine verb may have the noun to which it refers in the previous verse.
You may also have what you are looking for in a verse which does have a feminine noun but which is not the subject of the feminine verb.
If you want to get a feel for how the GSE works. After typing the above search on the command line, click on "Tools" under the command line, and choose "Graphical Search Engine" and you will see what this search looks like in the GSE. You can make alterations or additions within the GSE based on your rough search on the command line.
Mark Eddy