PDA

View Full Version : LXX symbol in bwgrkl



Aries
01-05-2010, 07:09 AM
In his book on the text of the Old Testament, Ernst Würthwein marks the Septuagint with a special symbol, other than LXX (cf. The Text of the Old Testament (Eerdmans Publishing 1995), p. 50). It looks like a S, but it also seems somewhat like a G. I haven't got a clue what character it is and I don't see something like it in the Bibleworks font bwgrkl (where I do recognize symbols of the Codex Sinaiticus (aleph), the Majority Text (M), papyrus (P) etc. Does anyone know where to find that LXX-symbol of Würthwein?

bkMitchell
01-05-2010, 10:30 AM
In his book on the text of the Old Testament, Ernst Würthwein marks the Septuagint with a special symbol, other than LXX (cf. The Text of the Old Testament (Eerdmans Publishing 1995), p. 50).

I believe that is a Gothic or Blackletter font for 'G' you should try looking at the Textualis typeface it may look fairly simular.

You can find it included in SIL Apparatus fonts.(link) (http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&item_id=ApparatusSIL)
"The SIL Apparatus Fonts were designed to provide most of the symbols needed to reproduce the textual apparatus found in major editions of Greek & Hebrew biblical texts."



Also, a letter like it is encoded in Unicode see below:
20178𝕲1D572MATHEMATICAL BOLD FRAKTUR CAPITAL G

ISalzman
01-05-2010, 12:16 PM
In his book on the text of the Old Testament, Ernst Würthwein marks the Septuagint with a special symbol, other than LXX (cf. The Text of the Old Testament (Eerdmans Publishing 1995), p. 50). It looks like a S, but it also seems somewhat like a G. I haven't got a clue what character it is and I don't see something like it in the Bibleworks font bwgrkl (where I do recognize symbols of the Codex Sinaiticus (aleph), the Majority Text (M), papyrus (P) etc. Does anyone know where to find that LXX-symbol of Würthwein?

It's actually a Gothic 'G' for Greek. It is the typical LXX symbol in the apparatus of the Hebrew Old Testament. If you have a copy of BHS (Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia), in the prolegomena, they explain/decipher all the symbols. The Gothic 'G' stands for the Septuagint or LXX. Würthwein's is a great book, isn't it?

MGVH
01-05-2010, 12:30 PM
You can enter the LXX symbol in Word using Unicode. Type 1D516 and then hit ALT-X.
For more info, see THIS POST (http://bibleandtech.blogspot.com/2007/11/unicode-greek-text-critical-and-little.html) and follow the links.

ISalzman
01-05-2010, 12:42 PM
You can enter the LXX symbol in Word using Unicode. Type 1D516 and then hit ALT-X.
For more info, see THIS POST (http://bibleandtech.blogspot.com/2007/11/unicode-greek-text-critical-and-little.html) and follow the links.

Hey Mark, would that trick work in Word 2003 (in Windows XP)? Thanks.

MGVH
01-05-2010, 01:05 PM
Actually, it is not the Gothic G but a Gothic S (for Septuagint).
It has it owns specified coding in the Unicode consortium (see this PDF (http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U1D400.pdf)) as:
"1D516 MATHEMATICAL FRAKTUR CAPITAL S = Septuagint, Greek Old Testament"

So use 1D516
(and not 1D50A = fraktur capital G or 1D572 which is a bold fraktur capital G)

MGVH
01-05-2010, 01:06 PM
I'm unable to check that anymore... but I'm pretty sure that it does.

ISalzman
01-05-2010, 01:19 PM
Thanks Mark.

bkMitchell
01-05-2010, 06:20 PM
Actually, it is not the Gothic G but a Gothic S (for Septuagint).


Thanks for the correction and info.

Quick Question though: what do you think of the SIL(summer institute of Lingustistic)'s SIL apparatus fonts in Unicode?(link) (http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&item_id=ApparatusSIL)

MGVH
01-05-2010, 11:52 PM
It is an attractive font, somewhat heavy in weight, but clear. The frakturs are simplified. (So that S really looks more like a S and is not confused with G.) It is also nice to have a Unicode font that includes all the apparatus characters.
Still, I tend to use Cardo because it includes all the apparatus characters and all the Greek and Hebrew. It's just easier to have one Unicode font to handle all that stuff.

bkMitchell
01-06-2010, 11:24 PM
Still, I tend to use Cardo because it includes all the apparatus characters and all the Greek and Hebrew. It's just easier to have one Unicode font to handle all that stuff.

Thank you so much for the quick reply! I didn't know that Cardo had all the apparatus Characters, too. I am going to try using that font more.

ISalzman
01-07-2010, 12:59 PM
It is an attractive font, somewhat heavy in weight, but clear. The frakturs are simplified. (So that S really looks more like a S and is not confused with G.) It is also nice to have a Unicode font that includes all the apparatus characters.
Still, I tend to use Cardo because it includes all the apparatus characters and all the Greek and Hebrew. It's just easier to have one Unicode font to handle all that stuff.

Hey Mark, I noticed that I don't have the Cardo font installed on my system; it is not listed as one of the available fonts in MS Office Word 2003 anyway. Is there a website from which I may download the Cardo font? And will it work on a system running Windows XP?

bkMitchell
01-07-2010, 06:21 PM
Is there a website from which I may download the Cardo font? And will it work on a system running Windows XP?

I'm not not Mark, but you can download the Cardo font from the following site: http://www.scholarsfonts.net/cardofnt.html

ISalzman
01-07-2010, 06:42 PM
I'm not not Mark, but you can download the Cardo font from the following site: http://www.scholarsfonts.net/cardofnt.html

If it's any consolation, I'm not Mark either. Thanks Brian.

bkMitchell
01-07-2010, 09:22 PM
If it's any consolation, I'm not Mark either. Thanks Brian.

Opps typo! I used a double negative:(! There was only supposed to be one "no" rather than " not not". No offense to people with the name Mark.

Aries
01-13-2010, 01:04 PM
Thanks for all the answers. I should have looked in BHS, but as I am used in using Bible Works, I don't look much in the print-version anymore ;-) I am not familiair to working with unicode fonts (I use the bibleworks font most of the time). Can I just install cardo (or the like), type the ID516 code en press ALT+X?

MGVH
01-13-2010, 09:04 PM
If you only need an occasional Greek character, then that works fine. (But it's 1D516 not ID516.) If you need to do more typing in Greek/Hebrew, then you really need to install Unicode keyboards or get Tavultesoft's Keyman or use an online "Greek inputter" (http://users.ox.ac.uk/%7Etayl0010/polytonic-greek-inputter.html) or Logos' Shibboleth (http://www.logos.com/shibboleth) or check here.
(http://bibleandtech.blogspot.com/2008/04/unicode-greek-office2007-update-logos.html)