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Dale A. Brueggemann
11-30-2009, 10:51 PM
What do you know about the God's Word translation? It sells itself as accurate and readable, but then who would sell their work as inaccurate and incomprehensible?

Michael Hanel
11-30-2009, 11:03 PM
What do you know about the God's Word translation? It sells itself as accurate and readable, but then who would sell their work as inaccurate and incomprehensible?

Although I don't specifically know any of the people involved in it, I did know that there were a few Lutherans (Missouri Synod variety) who were in on it. I don't know the marketing behind it, but I kind of get the feeling that it's a failed translation because it lacked good marketing. I've used it only very rarely and even then that was back in the early part of this decade. In other words, I didn't use it long enough to get a good feel for it's strengths and weaknesses, I can only defer to others.

A wiki article on it seems pretty informative however. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God%27s_Word_Translation_%28GW%29)

Adelphos
11-30-2009, 11:46 PM
What do you know about the God's Word translation? It sells itself as accurate and readable, but then who would sell their work as inaccurate and incomprehensible?

Personally I think it's just another of the many wet-noodle translations. Nevertheless, you can see for yourself, as e-Sword has it available as a free add-on.

http://www.e-sword.net/downloads.html

Mark Eddy
11-30-2009, 11:47 PM
If you mean God's Word to the Nations (GWN) in BibleWorks, it was originally intended as an improvement of An American Translation by William Beck of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod (with final editing after his death by various conservative Lutherans). Beck was convinced that most American could not understand King James English any more (he had been a pastor in a small Illinois town with lots of uneducated farmers, some of whom still spoke German at home--I was the pastor for some of them a generation later). Beck was alarmed that the RSV was too loose with its acceptance of emendations for the Old Testament, and that it had a liberal bias against the deity of Jesus Christ.
God's Word to the Nations Bible Society was begun for the project of going through hundreds of suggestions for correction of AAT which had been received by original publisher, leading to the publication of a more accurate translation (Beck was definitely a dynamic equivalence guy, sometimes to a fault). A New Testament was published in 1988, which included some helpful notes and special notice for fulfillment of prophecies. It was entitled God's Word to the Nations: New Evangelical Translation (NET). But the latter name was taken by another group, so it had to be changed. The New Testament was well enough received to keep the Bible Society going long enough to finish the Old Testament and (it turns out) a rather thorough revision of the New Testament as well.
Concerning the two men most responsible for work on the Old Testament, one previously taught Hebrew at Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and the other currently teaches Hebrew and Old Testament at Concordia University, Chicago, both institutions of the LC-MS. I enjoyed the first as a teacher and the second was a year or so ahead of me in school, both very bright men.
Once the translation was done, the GWNBS decided that they wanted to promote the translation beyond its Lutheran roots, so its current publisher was contracted, and the Bible Society shut down.
I personally used GWN for Sunday morning public Bible readings before they were published, and my congregation was one of many which participated in surveys intended to make sure that GWN did not contain unintelligible religous jargon. The result of this survey was further changes in the translation.
I personally prefer a more literal translation, and I think that the first revision of the N.T. was better than the final version. Others agreed, and a separate update of AAT was done by the original publisher as a result. But I have found the GWN Old Testament to be helpful, especially when the forms of the Hebrew do not match well with English idioms, in other words, where some slight paraphrasing can improve comprehension.
In general GWN gets high marks from me for being readable, slightly lower marks for being accurate, but higher marks for accuracy than most of the dynamic equivalence translations in BW.
Mark Eddy

Adelphos
11-30-2009, 11:51 PM
Didn't know it was available in BW, but it's the same one that e-Sword offers, so you can see for yourself. I have serious problems with many of its renderings, such as John 1:1, just for starters.

Dale A. Brueggemann
12-01-2009, 12:17 AM
I did know that there were a few Lutherans (Missouri Synod variety) who were in on it....
A wiki article on it seems pretty informative however. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God%27s_Word_Translation_%28GW%29)

Yes, I did not the Missouri Synod representation on its committee. Thanks for the heads up on the wiki article.

Dale A. Brueggemann
12-01-2009, 12:32 AM
Thanks for all the responses. Like Scott, I hadn't realized it was the GWN text in BW.

Dan Phillips
12-02-2009, 07:23 PM
I was at a roll-out breakfast for pastors featuring this tr. As I recall, one of their boasts was a lower reading-age level than (say) the NAS.

jimofbentley
12-25-2009, 08:52 PM
You can read the history of this translation at:

http://www.godsword.org/cms/index.php/Pages/The-History-of-Our-Translation.html

Do not follow the link given in the "Copyright and Source Information" in Bible Works as it takes you to very non-related website.

I used God's Word for a while when it first came out, but didn't really like it, although I can not recall the particulars now.

I am curious what Adelphos means by a "wet-noodle translation". Although noodles, by their very nature, normally have to be "wet" to be any good :D I am sure that he doesn't mean it in a positive manner.

bkMitchell
12-26-2009, 12:03 AM
I am curious what Adelphos means by a "wet-noodle translation".

I'm not Adelphos, but let me try here..

Wet-noodle's are what? They are lose and free, right. So, he probably means that the translation in question is too free and not literal.

Adelphos
12-26-2009, 02:17 PM
Wet-noodle's are what? They are lose and free, right. So, he probably means that the translation in question is too free and not literal.

Very good, along with other things.