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ISalzman
10-29-2009, 11:25 AM
In the 'Recommended Updates' area of the BW Updater this morning, in addition to the updated BW executable, there was also an item entitled 'Zurcher Bible Versions Update.' I'm at a loss to know what this is. Usually foreign language version updates appear in the 'Optional Updates' area. Is this 'Zurcher Bible Versions Update' critical to the operation of the program so as to warrant mention in the 'Recommended Updates' area? I don't usually apply patches for languages which I don't use in the program. 'Zurcher' looks like it might be related to Zurich? Hence, a Swiss German version of the Bible maybe? Anyways, grateful for any direction. Thanks.

ingosorke
10-29-2009, 11:36 AM
Yes, a German translation. Update is not program-critical.
On the other hand, if you're Swiss . . .

Ingo

ISalzman
10-29-2009, 11:48 AM
Yes, a German translation. Update is not program-critical.
On the other hand, if you're Swiss . . .

Ingo

Thanks Ingo. Do you know why the update would have been posted to the recommended updates area?

By the way, would there be a huge difference between a German translation and a Swiss German translation? Forgive me for my ignorance, but I had always heard that the biggest differences between the two were more spoken and of a pronunciation variety, and not so much written.

Adelphos
10-29-2009, 02:30 PM
Thanks Ingo. Do you know why the update would have been posted to the recommended updates area?

By the way, would there be a huge difference between a German translation and a Swiss German translation? Forgive me for my ignorance, but I had always heard that the biggest differences between the two were more spoken and of a pronunciation variety, and not so much written.

The Swiss dialect is different than any of the German dialects, but not so that one can't clearly understand the other.

Naturally, there are also loan words that enter into the mix as one gets closer to the border of German-speaking Switzerland and French-speaking Switzerland, although I've never figured out if "oui" in place of "ja" is a true loan word or is merely a pure French word used in place of a pure German word.

With regard to the placement of the Zurcher Bibel, I wouldn't get too bogged down on technicalities. There are quite a few German users of BibleWorks, so it pays to make sure they are aware of German updates.

ISalzman
10-29-2009, 02:57 PM
The Swiss dialect is different than any of the German dialects, but not so that one can't clearly understand the other.

Naturally, there are also loan words that enter into the mix as one gets closer to the border of German-speaking Switzerland and French-speaking Switzerland, although I've never figured out if "oui" in place of "ja" is a true loan word or is merely a pure French word used in place of a pure German word.

With regard to the placement of the Zurcher Bibel, I wouldn't get too bogged down on technicalities. There are quite a few German users of BibleWorks, so it pays to make sure they are aware of German updates.

Thanks for the response. I'm not overly bogged down about the technicalities, but the traditional division of recommended updates from optional updates is very helpful and one that enables one quickly to cut through the clutter and get to the critical updates quickly. I am all for the foreign language updates and apply some of them myself periodically. I'm just saying that it is helpful to have the optional updates set off from the critical ones. Nothing more, nothing less. But, again, thanks.

Adelphos
10-29-2009, 03:10 PM
I am all for the foreign language updates and apply some of them myself periodically.

Is it me, or does anyone else see the irony of someone with a German last name who can speak French but not German? :p

ISalzman
10-29-2009, 03:50 PM
Is it me, or does anyone else see the irony of someone with a German last name who can speak French but not German? :p

Actually, I can understand a little German. One of the languages I learned growing up was Yiddish, the language of the European Jews that was based on "Middle" or "High German." But it also has a number of import words from Hebrew and the vernacular of several Eastern European countries. Yiddish is written in Hebrew characters. Yiddish differs slightly from German in its pronunciation.

One of my favorite and most comical memories of my exposure to German was forged in the summer of 1994, when I spent a month in France on a campaign to share the gospel of Jesus with the Jewish community there. For the two weeks that we spent in Paris, we were housed at a French Bible Institute in the suburb of Nogent-sur-Marne. As this was during the summer months, and school was out, the dorms were used to house visiting missionaries. The staff at the Bible Institute spoke a number of foreign languages, which was necessary since there were missionary guests from a number of different countries. On weekends however, the staff would go home. So there were no wait staff on duty.

One weekend, a family of German missionaries arrived at the Institute most unexpectedly. They spoke no English, no French, only German. The unfortunate thing was that there was nobody present at the institute that could speak German. This German family was unable to locate any of the most basic supplies and necessities such as wash cloths, bedding, sheets, towels, toilet paper, etc. And they were more than a little anxious.

At that point, I figured I'd try the only thing I could do, and that was use my Yiddish. I spoke to them in Yiddish and they replied and spoke to me in German. And we each made ourselves understandable to the other. I, for all intents and purposes, salvaged their weekend for them. But the funniest thing for me was seeing the looks on their faces when they were listening to me address them in Yiddish. What I could tell they were wondering was, "What kind of a horrible, bastardized, German does this guy speak?" But, in the end, I was able to help them with whatever they needed. And, despite my dialect shortcomings, they really appreciated my efforts and help. But I'll never forget that as long as I live.