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heathde
07-10-2008, 12:57 PM
I'm new to BW7 and just beginning to grasp the rich feature set of this software. So far I have not found a trully "Analytical Greek Lexicon" similar to Moulton where words that are combinations of words are broken down into their source words. As in the word below which is composed of a word meaning "many" and a word meaning "ways." Am I missing something?
Thanks for any assistance here!


polutro,pwj adverb from polutro,pwj

Michael Hanel
07-10-2008, 03:08 PM
I am not familiar with all of the analytical lexica out there (you mentioned Moulton's), but to an extent various lexica in BW do this (though if Moulton does this for every word, you may be somewhat disappointed).

For instance, this is the beginning of the LSJ (abridged) entry for that word:

πολύ-τροπος, ον, (τρέπω) much-turned, i.e. muchtravelled,

Depending on the word BDAG or one of the other lexica might also include etymological hints, but depending on your level of Greek, most of the etymologies are transparent -- although there are also those that have multiple possible etymologies too....

heathde
07-11-2008, 02:11 AM
Michael, thanks for your reply.
I did see some examples of compound words for which their roots were identified but this appears to not be common. Moulton provides a detailed analysis of compound words which I think helps in identifying their usage elsewhere along with perhaps a better understanding of their meaning.
I was hoping to put aside my printed references for my laptop but this may not be possible.
Thanks again!
Dennis

Michael Hanel
07-11-2008, 10:58 AM
Moulton provides a detailed analysis of compound words which I think helps in identifying their usage elsewhere along with perhaps a better understanding of their meaning.
I was hoping to put aside my printed references for my laptop but this may not be possible.
Thanks again!
Dennis

I don't want to turn this into a different topic too much, but I want to jump on a potential exegetical fallacy fire before it starts. If what you are interested in is a better understanding of a word's meaning, BDAG will be of greatest import to you. Breaking down words into their compounds may or may not be helpful in understanding the words meaning. A word is not necessarily the sum of its parts. Context and prior usage of the word will be far more important and helpful to you.

That said, I do find breaking down words into constituent components is helpful in remembering a "base" meaning to a word for purposes of knowing general vocabulary. But that is not often all that helpful for coming up w the word's meaning in a given context.

Take for instance sullamba,nw - clearly it is simply the preposition sun plus the verb lamba,nw and you might get the notion "to take with." Now that might help you get the idea "arrest, apprehend" (BDAG 1a) or even "help, aid, support" (BDAG 4), but unless you're very creative, your mind won't jump to "to conceive, become pregnant" (BDAG 3). Sure you could make up something to fill in the gaps like "to take (with child)", but I think you'd be better off not trying to do that much.

When I use words in English, I certainly don't use them with any conscious notion of what their constituent parts are, I use them because I think they're the right word for what I'm trying to say regardless of whether they really are (i.e. sometimes I choose the wrong words, or maybe there could have been a better one).

In any event, I really didn't mean to give a sermon, just wanted to let you know if you're really after "deep" meanings of words, BDAG is still going to be your better resource in the long-run than breaking down words in Moulton. But if you're just using Moulton to recognize parts of words and help in basic reading and comprehension, then I suppose that's not a bad strategy.

SCSaunders
07-11-2008, 11:47 AM
I don't want to turn this into a different topic too much, but I want to jump on a potential exegetical fallacy fire before it starts. ... In any event, I really didn't mean to give a sermon, just wanted to let you know if you're really after "deep" meanings of words, BDAG is still going to be your better resource in the long-run than breaking down words in Moulton. But if you're just using Moulton to recognize parts of words and help in basic reading and comprehension, then I suppose that's not a bad strategy.Superb post: beginning, middle and end. JMHO.

heathde
07-11-2008, 10:02 PM
Valid points.
Just surprised that BW does not have the lexical break-down of Moulton. The meaning of individual words can provide insight into how they are being used, though, as you mentioned, not always. Thatís the great thing about Biblical Greek, the limited vocabulary, and the abundance of tools for understanding the original language. Moulton has been a great aid in increasing my own Greek vocabulary so that is what I was looking for.

Iím not familiar with BDAGÖthis appears to be a module that can be purchased separately? Is BDAG 3 something else?

Greg Ward
07-12-2008, 02:45 PM
heathde,
One good historical review of BDAG and guide to using a lexicon is Rodney Decker's NT Resources. See either the pdf document or the ppt slideshow.

http://www.ntresources.com/bdag.html#Intro