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bobvenem
02-13-2007, 07:55 AM
<message removed>

Adelphos
02-13-2007, 06:07 PM
e-Sword has copies of the 1611 KJV, the Geneva Bible, and The Bishop's compiled for their engine. I am in the process of converting them to BW7 readable text files so I can add them as modules (to avoid copyright issues, I won't distribute them until I contact e-Sword).

BibleWorks already contains the 1534 Tyndale Bible (TNT), 1595 Bishop's New Testament (PNT), and the 1599 Geneva Bible (GNV).

Sirmace
03-30-2007, 08:52 PM
"I've also found an archive of John Wyclif's Bible in Middle English spelling and standard text format, though that will require a bit more work."
:) Oh, that would be very nice! I would greatly desire to have a BW text to go with my print facsimile of a Wycliffe/Purvey NT. If you manage this inspired task, I would be grateful indeed!

Adelphos
04-02-2007, 08:08 AM
...which explicitly states there is a copyright on Coverdale,...

I'm no expert, but unless they've made significant changes, I don't think there is any way they can copyright Coverdale, or any of the other Reformation Bibles. Those texts are in the public domain.

Adelphos
04-02-2007, 08:32 AM
Now, as for getting them out to the public, I don't have access to any server space. What would be the best way to get this uploaded for distribution (at least Wyclif)?

Let's let Michael Hanel weigh in. I think he'll want to post them on the BW Blog site. If not, I'll host them on my website.

Michael, over to you. :rolleyes:

Dale A. Brueggemann
04-02-2007, 09:14 AM
I'm no expert, but unless they've made significant changes, I don't think there is any way they can copyright Coverdale, or any of the other Reformation Bibles. Those texts are in the public domain.

Actually, they can copyright the electronic version, and that's surely what they are referring to.

Adelphos
04-02-2007, 09:57 AM
Actually, they can copyright the electronic version, and that's surely what they are referring to.

I don't see how. If I want to take the text of Coverdale and type it into my computer, or scan it, or what-have-you, and if I wanted to share that text with anyone or everyone, I don't see any way that I could be legally liable for doing so.

If they have a particular electronic format, or have made significant changes to the text itself, then I suppose they could make the case for a copyright, but unless I miss my guess -- and as I said, I'm no expert -- a text that old that's in the public domain would, I suspect, be very, very hard to enforce a copyright on.

Michael Hanel
04-02-2007, 10:39 AM
The exact disclaimer from StudyLight (not SearchLight--sorry) is:

The text of the Myles Coverdale Bible (1535) was developed into electronic form through the work of dozens of laborers in the Ukraine. Please refrain from using this material without written concent of the copyright holders.

2003 StudyLight.org, ul Schuberta 42, Gdansk Poland and Christian Library, ul. Pintera 18-27, Donetsk, Ukraine.
This implies a copyright is in force for the electronic version. I contacted StudyLight to see about allowing a text version of their html be released freely for BW users. I have not yet heard back from them.

Bob


If you get permission on this or somehow get it verified that it won't be infringing anyone's rights, email me that info via the forums and I'll get it up on the BibleWorks blog. Other people can host questionable files, but we try very hard not to step on anyone's toes even though copyright status can often be dubious.

Dale A. Brueggemann
04-02-2007, 12:54 PM
I don't see how. If I want to take the text of Coverdale and type it into my computer, or scan it, or what-have-you, and if I wanted to share that text with anyone or everyone, I don't see any way that I could be legally liable for doing so.

If you typed or scanned it in, then it would be your own electronic version, and indeed it would be copyright free unless you put a copyright on your labor. And it would be a lot of labor.



If they have a particular electronic format, or have made significant changes to the text itself, then I suppose they could make the case for a copyright, but unless I miss my guess -- and as I said, I'm no expert -- a text that old that's in the public domain would, I suspect, be very, very hard to enforce a copyright on.

If they typed or scanned it in, that qualifies as their "particular electronic format." And whether it's "very, very hard to enforce a copyright" or not isn't the point. The point is, it's illegal and immoral to violate a legitimate copyright.

Adelphos
04-02-2007, 12:56 PM
The exact disclaimer from StudyLight (not SearchLight--sorry) is

Personally, I think the "copyright" is completely bogus. You can't copyright public domain material, and the transmission into electronic format doesn't wash, in my opinion, for anyone who wants can type or scan the text into electronic format.

Some expert in this area can correct me if I'm wrong, but I'll need to see specific law to be convinced.

Finally, I think it's a bit arrogant to try to stake a claim on a Bible version that's been in the public domain for several centuries. If they want to be reimbursed for their efforts, they should ask for contributions, but to stake a claim on a Bible version that's already in the public domain is arrogant to say the least.

Also, if you've taken the time and made the effort to convert the text into BW format, then presumably it is in a different format than that which you originally obtained.

Michael Hanel
04-02-2007, 01:15 PM
Thanks, Michael.

Returning to Wyclif, the text file I formatted was from the Wesleyan Study Center website, where they have the text available freely for download with no disclaimers. I contacted them regarding distributing the text for free use by BW users, and have not received a reply. However, since the text was already being freely distributed, could you post Wyclif to the blog?

Bob

Give me a line via email and I'll try to get it up in a day or so.

Adelphos
04-02-2007, 01:56 PM
Give me a line via email and I'll try to get it up in a day or so.

Bob,

Even though I don't think the copyright on the Coverdale Bible is legitimate, I'm going to let Michael host all the files on the blog, as I don't care to get involved in any disputes on this matter.

Hopefully they will give you "permission," although, as I said, if your format is different than theirs, then there may be no issue, especially with a text that's been in the public domain for several centuries, and any motivation to stake a quick claim and make a profit on such a text, especially since it's a Bible version, is far more immoral than any questionable breach of a questionable copyright.

Of course, I'm not saying that that was their motivation. I'm saying that anyone who has such a motivation would be on the wrong side of the issue.