PDA

View Full Version : need help with searching



ugotdave
05-02-2006, 08:09 PM
Dose anyone know of a search method within BW 6.0, where I can search the NT Greek for all instances, where a part of speech, pronoun, adjective, etc, has an antecedent?

Michael Hanel
05-02-2006, 08:20 PM
Dose anyone know of a search method within BW 6.0, where I can search the NT Greek for all instances, where a part of speech, pronoun, adjective, etc, has an antecedent?



I don't think you can do what you want without doing a lot of the homework yourself.

For instance, you can search for parts of speech and then search for other or the same parts of speech that have the same gender, number and case, but this is not the same thing as you want. The problem is that there is no tagging that hooks up one part of speech with its antecedent. You would have to look at the verses and decide that yourself.

Take John 1:4 for instance "in him was life..." There is no search you can do that would tell you what the antecedent of "him" was. You would only get this by reading in the context yourself.

Also consider that not all parts of speech have antecedents that are specifically in the text.

Anyway, there are a number of issues that make your exact requirements an impossibility for now, but as I said, you can do searches that could be limited to certain word agreements, but that doesn't sound like what you're looking for.....

ugotdave
05-02-2006, 08:39 PM
Michael,

Is it safe to say that some antecedent relationships would be subjective? :rolleyes:

Michael Hanel
05-02-2006, 09:12 PM
Michael,

Is it safe to say that some antecedent relationships would be subjective? :rolleyes:

I suppose so if the meaning of "some" is subjective :p I obviously have no hard figures, I just know that antecedent hunting is part of the joy of translating :) Try looking at Wallace (p 334) on his discussion of Eph 2:8 for one example of what I meant...

ugotdave
05-03-2006, 07:36 AM
Thanks for your input Michael.

Glenn Weaver
05-04-2006, 11:58 AM
Actually, the GNM NT Greek morphology version has tags that identify when there is an antecendent, and when there is no antecedent in the text. These tags are the '+' and '-' signs.

For example, to find adjectives that are antecedents for words that follow, search in the GNM for

.*@a*+

To find all words that have an antecedent, search on

.*@+*

After you type the @ sign, the Morphology Help appears. Press the Esc key once to close the helper, then you can type the '+' sign, followed by the '*'.

You can also find the antecedent combinations by searching on multiple words on the Command Line. For example, search on the following, and notice the hits you receive. Don't forget the space between the two words.

.*@*+ *@+*

To find where there is no antecedent in the text, use the '-' sign. For example,

.*@-*

For more information about the GNM tagging, see chapter 44 in the Help file. The front matter of the Friberg Analytical Green New Testament also contains information about this database. You can access this information via the link in the GNM version identification file (place your cursor on the letters 'GNM' in the Browse Window, and the version ID file displays in the Word Analysis Window), or through the Friberg Lexicon front matter (select 'AGNT Introduction') in the Lexicon Browser.

Hope this helps.

Glenn

Michael Hanel
05-04-2006, 12:04 PM
Actually, the GNM NT Greek morphology version has tags that identify when there is an antecendent, and when there is no antecedent in the text. These tags are the '+' and '-' signs.


I stand corrected :)

Glenn Weaver
05-04-2006, 12:16 PM
Dear Michael,

You are still partly correct. The Friberg database doesn't show the exact connections between the words, nor does it tag every word that has an antecedent. I checked a few of the examples provided in the Wallace section you cited, and the examples I checked were not tagged in the GNM.

So, interpretive work is still needed, after making carefully-constructed searches.

Glenn