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View Full Version : BW7 NLT is different to all my other NLT'S!



Dunk
03-10-2006, 07:38 PM
Hi,
I noticed today that a couple of verses are different in my BW7 NLT compared with my Life Application NLT (leatherbound), and my Pradis NLT.

Does anyone know why this is?

Is there more than one edition?

The verses that I noticed different are: Rom 8:30 &


Ro 8:30 And having chosen them, ..... and he promised them his glory.
(from Pradis NLT & Life Application NLT leather-bound)


NLT Romans 8:30 And having chosen them, .... he gave them his glory.
(From Bibleworks)


NLT Matthew 22:7 "The king was furious, (Bibleworks 7)

Mt 22:7 "Then the king became furious (Pradis NLT & Life Application NLT leather-bound)

Interestingly these examples are both to do with how the aorist is translated.

Michael Hanel
03-10-2006, 08:17 PM
Hi,
I noticed today that a couple of verses are different in my BW7 NLT compared with my Life Application NLT (leatherbound), and my Pradis NLT.

Does anyone know why this is?

Is there more than one edition?




See this thread (http://www.bibleworks.com/forums/showthread.php?t=640). I cannot tell you why the publishers of NLT sent the update to BibleWorks nor do I know why the changes have been relatively hush-hush. I would think revisions would be rather blatant so people could get the newer copies, but for better or for worse BW has updated copies of the NLT. If you want the older version of NLT you'd have to do some digging. It would be on the installation CDs of BW6. You'd have to export the text and recompile it though. But since BW doesn't have copyright on texts like these they can only do what publishers will allow and I guess NLT only wanted this second edition released/available.

Dunk
03-10-2006, 08:55 PM
Thanks for the info, I'd tried a search for NLT and got nothing (maybe pilot error).
It's too bad the revision was hush hush. It could cause some embarrassment and confusion in Bible studies etc.

It also ruins some of the examples I wanted to use of ingressive or proleptic aorist translations!

Gontroppo
03-11-2006, 12:18 AM
Hi Dunk.

The NLT was revised last year. The revision contains thousands of changes, and most of them good, I think. The NLT began as a paraphrase called The Living Bible and was only a modernised version of the American Standard Version, by Ken Taylor, who did not read Hebrew, Aramiac or Greek, as I understand it.

In 1996, scholars took the Living Bible and worked on making it more accurate, by carefully looking at the original languages and keeping what they could of the Living Bible where possible.

But over several years a revision of the NLT was made in which the link with the Living Bible became even less obvious.

The NLT2 is often more conservative in its translation, while still using colloquial English and still being often quite interpretive.

I am enjoying the NLT2 greatly.

It has not been done in secret. There has been quite a bit of publicity about the new version.

Many of the scholars who worked on the NLT also worked on the ESV and other bible versions.

It is a first-class, reliable translation that should be used in conjunction with more literal version for comparison.

Mark Taylor, please correct any errors in my assertions here!

David McKay
www.davidmckay.info (http://www.davidmckay.info)

Mark Eddy
03-11-2006, 12:34 PM
From time to time there has been discussion of NLT2 on the BibleTranslation discussion list [Bible-Translation@lists.kastanet.org], most recently yesterday. You may want to check this out. The comparison of NLT and NLT 2 isn't really a BibleWorks issue.
Mark Eddy

Dunk
03-12-2006, 05:23 PM
Thanks for the info everyone,
Just goes to show its all about knowing where to look, I've been ordering vast quantities of NLT's for a while and had no idea there was an NLT 2!
As usual this forum has been a great help.
Many thanks

Gontroppo
03-12-2006, 11:21 PM
Hi Dunk.
I would assume that any NLT you buy now would in fact be an NLT2.

David McKay
www.davidmckay.info (http://www.davidmckay.info)

wildboar
03-13-2006, 02:02 AM
Actually, you can't assume that the NLT that you pick up off the shelf at your local bookstore is the NLT2. Many of the original NLT's have gone out of print but many are still being produced. There is currently no large print Life Application Bible in the NLT2 but the original is still in print. The study notes have also been revised in the regual size Life Application. I work for a Christian bookstore and have taken the time to separate the 2nd editions from the first editions but I haven't seen anyone else do this. The newer editions have a different logo, which is the easiest way to tell the difference. We have asked Tyndale for literature explaining the differences but received little information in the way of actual comparison. This Bibleworks forum has been far more helpful than Tyndale has been. I'm not much of a fan of the original or the 2nd edition but still would like to be able to explain to my customer the differences. I really don't see the point of spending all the money and going through all the trouble to produce a revision if you aren't going to tell people about it. Of course I don't know why Zondervan makes Wide-margin versions of the TNIV but just markets them as square Bibles and doesn't say anything about them having wide-margins for notes. I guess that's why I don't get the big marketing salary those guys get, of course we haven't sold a single copy of 'em. It's probably for the same reason they keep putting those NCV Bibles out in all the different formats when nobody even knows what it is...people just say they want the magazine Bible or the Max Lucado Bible.

Gontroppo
03-13-2006, 05:49 AM
G'day Wild Boar.
Don't spose you can tell me whether the Essential Evangelical Parallel Bible is NLT2, please?

David McKay
www.davidmckay.info (http://www.davidmckay.info) :confused:

vr8ce
03-13-2006, 07:30 PM
G'day Wild Boar.
Don't spose you can tell me whether the Essential Evangelical Parallel Bible is NLT2, please?
According to the book description on Amazon, "The EEPB is particularly noteworthy because it is the first parallel Bible to feature the updated NLT text." That's semi-interesting, since the EEPB was published 12/2004 and NLT2 wasn't released until 3/2005, but I guess they got the text prior to the NLT2 hitting the streets.

Vince

hubmair
03-14-2006, 01:25 AM
David

Taylor held the Th. D. from Dallas Theological Seminary. I would imagine that he know some Hebrew and Greek. Here is a link that tells something about his life.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2005/123/55.0.html

wildboar
03-14-2006, 01:28 AM
From my comparison of the various parallel Bibles we have on our shelf, none of them contain the 2nd edition. I think I just checked the back of the Essential Evangelical parallel Bible and determined by the translation displayed that it was the 1st edition. When I go to work on Wednescay I'll check to see if perhaps the 2nd edition is actually inside and they just didn't update the sample on the back. I'll wait until they come out with a NKJV/NASB/ESV/HCSB parallel Bible to purchase my parallel Bible:D

Gontroppo
03-14-2006, 02:45 PM
Thanks for the link Randy. I don't think I said he didn't know any Hebrew, Aramiac or Greek, but the link confirms that he paraphrased the ASV and did not translate from the original.

As I've said before, I began reading his paraphrase when he published Living Letters. It was 1965 and my mother gave it to me for my 13th birthday. At the same time, I also read Norman Vincent Peale's The Power of Positive Thinking. I enjoyed that for a time, but reflecting on their theology later led to me rating Peale appalling, but Paul appealing.

Wild Boar, I see you would prefer a parallel bible where all the versions are almost exactly the same! There is much to be gained from variety in translation techniques. The NLT2 is often more accurate in presenting the meaning of the bible than the supposedly more literal versions. Consulting versions in good idiomatic English has sometimes helped me to understand what the bible writers are getting at in a way that the formally equivalent ones such as you cite have been unable to do.

And while I think The Message must be used with great caution [for one thing, the apostle Paul comes across with an outrageous American accent!] it sometimes gives the flavour of the original very well. Micah chapter 1 is a case in point here.

David McKay
www.davidmckay.info (http://www.davidmckay.info) :D

terogs
03-14-2006, 11:55 PM
From my comparison of the various parallel Bibles we have on our shelf, none of them contain the 2nd edition. I think I just checked the back of the Essential Evangelical parallel Bible and determined by the translation displayed that it was the 1st edition. When I go to work on Wednescay I'll check to see if perhaps the 2nd edition is actually inside and they just didn't update the sample on the back. I'll wait until they come out with a NKJV/NASB/ESV/HCSB parallel Bible to purchase my parallel Bible:D

I checked my copy of the Essential Evangelical Parallel Bible. The blurb on the back says it contains the new updated version of the NLT. The note to the reader in the introductory section also states that it is the "second generation text . . . completed in 2004." And, the text inside of Matt 5:1-4 is the same as in BibleWorks 7, but different from the sample on the back book cover.

I think they just forgot to update the sample on the back of the book.

wildboar
03-15-2006, 10:04 AM
My problem in general with dynamic equivalence is that it is basically a denial of historic reformation doctrine of the verbal inspiration of Scripture. The NLT2 often drifts off into paraphrase and the Message is of course a paraphrase. A paraphrase can be helpful if the person reading the paraphrase realizes that they are not reading the Scriptures but a person's interpretation of the Scriptures. The problem is that people are starting to use the NLT and the Message as translations. The NLT bills itself as an actual translation and although it does not have some of the horrendous reading of the old living Bible (Acts 13:48) it stills desires to present the tame god of modern evangelicalism in which God doesn't hate people (Rom. 9:13). If I want some help understanding the meaning of a passage I will consult a commentary or a few that will give me the various interpretations of the passage and the reasons for them.

Glenn Weaver
03-15-2006, 11:14 AM
it is probably a good time to take this topic to the non-BibleWorks forum list, before lots of Bible translation theory discussion gets started.

Glenn