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vr8ce
09-20-2005, 06:15 PM
I've searched the help, played around with several possibilities, and can't figure this one out. I'm sure it's painfully obvious, but I'm giving up and asking for directions.

How do I combine an "or" search with a "within X words" (*not* verses) search?

/filled full
finds verses with filled or full.
'filled *99 spirit
finds verses with filled followed by spirit in the same verse.

But how do I combine them? That is, I want to find all verses that has filled or full, followed by spirit?

I tried (/filled full)' *99 spirit, but that found verses with filled/full but not spirit.
I tried (/filled full) *99 spirit, but that did the same thing.
I tried '(/filled full) *99 spirit, but that said it couldn't find /filled.

What's the secret?

Furthermore, is there a "generic" trick for combining queries of different types (on the command line)? I.e. if algebra-wise it looks like
(a or b) and c,
or
(a and b) or c
or
(a or b) followed (in the same verse) by (c and d)
is there a "formula" for putting the queries together on the command line, i.e. something like (this doesn't work, just an example): "the prefix character for the first grouping goes in the first parentheses, followed by the prefix character of the second grouping outside the parentheses, followed by the second grouping in parentheses".

For example, that formula works for the first two examples, i.e.
(a or b) and c => (/a b).(c)
(a and b) or c => (.a b)/(c)
But it doesn't work for the last example.

Thanks!

Vince

Ben Spackman
09-20-2005, 07:54 PM
There's probably a way to do this from the command line, but frankly, I'm not sure how.

It's fairly easy to do from the graphical search engine.

In the command line type .fill spirit

Click the button for the GSE (graphic search engine).

Double click on the box with "fill" in it. Click "inclusion/exclusion list" then "add" and add the word "full." Click ok.

Now click on the "set ordering mode" button, which looks like two squares connected by an arc. Click on the "fill" box and drag to the "spirit" box. Now double click on teh connecting box, which should say "exactly 0", select "at most" and type in 99.

Click "go" in green at the top. After it runs, you can use "options" to export the verses and highlighting to the command center.

Praise God (and thank the programmers) for the GSE :)

Joe Fleener
09-21-2005, 09:54 AM
Hi Vince,

Try this on the command line:

('filled *99 spirit)/('full *99 spirit)

Joe

Mark Eddy
09-21-2005, 12:13 PM
In the command line type .fill spirit
If you type ' instead of . you won't have to do the first part of the "set ordering mode" step, because that box will already be displayed.

Click the button for the GSE (graphic search engine).
Do I detect someone who uses a program other the BW? BW calls it the "advanced search engine" or ASE.

Double click on the box with "fill" in it. Click "inclusion/exclusion list" then "add" and add the word "full." Click ok.
This won't get any instanced of "filled", so you'll have to add "filled" as well, unless you do what I suggest at the end.

Now click on the "set ordering mode" button, which looks like two squares connected by an arc. Click on the "fill" box and drag to the "spirit" box. Now double click on teh connecting box, which should say "exactly 0", select "at most" and type in 99.
You can use a number much less than 99.
Here's what I suggest on the command line:
'f?ll* *9 spirit
This will give a list of all verses that have "filled ... spirit" or "full ... spirit" or "fill ... spirit" (none of the latter turn out to be relevant), but also "follow ... spirit" or "fellowship ... spirit" (if these occur). If you know that you want to find only the two phrases "filled with ... spirit" or "full of ... spirit" then use Joe's suggestion.
But if you are in doubt about whether there may be other forms of the phrase you're searching, you will probably want to start by using the wildcard symbols:
? for any one letter
* for any number of letters.
You see, there are lots of ways to do a search in BW. Some find exactly what you're looking for. Some find things you may have wanted to look for but didn't think of beforehand. You can always use the verse list manager to exclude verses from a list that don't apply to what you were really looking for.
In Christ,
Mark Eddy

Ben Spackman
09-21-2005, 12:54 PM
Do I detect someone who uses a program other the BW? BW calls it the "advanced search engine" or ASE.

Well, I do, but none of them have anything similar that I use. My brain was simply on autopilot when I typed that response last night...:o

vr8ce
09-21-2005, 04:18 PM
Hi Vince, Try this on the command line:
('filled *99 spirit)/('full *99 spirit)
JoeRight, OK, that will work, didn't think about expanding the expression.

So, does that mean the generic "(a or b) followed by c" can't be done without expansion on the command line? Which means if it was "(a or b or c or d) followed by e" would have to be expanded to 5 separate "or" searches?

Thanks, Joe.

Vince

vr8ce
09-21-2005, 04:30 PM
You can use a number much less than 99.Well, yes, I know that, but it has nothing to do with the problem, nor is 9 enough (there are hundreds if not thousands of verses that have more than 11 words in them).

Here's what I suggest on the command line:
'f?ll* *9 spiritThanks, Joe suggested another workaround. I guess I wasn't very clear; I was trying to find out how to do a generic "(a or b or...) followed by c" query from the command line. And, since no one's spoken up, I guess it can't be done.

Thanks very much for the reply.

Vince

Joe Fleener
09-21-2005, 04:46 PM
So, does that mean the generic "(a or b) followed by c" can't be done without expansion on the command line? Which means if it was "(a or b or c or d) followed by e" would have to be expanded to 5 separate "or" searches?

Thanks, Joe.

Vince

Hi Vince,

I believe that is correct. I tried several diffent ways too, but the only way I could get to work was by expanding the number of "or" searches.

If anyone else figures it out, maybe they will share their knowledge with us.